If your connection to the VPN server drops for some reason then the killswitch will immediately sever your internet connection, so it’s best to keep an eye on your torrents. There’s a few different types of killswitch, such as those that a firewall-based, either using your device’s built-in firewall (if it has one) or via their own rules. Make sure you understand how your killswitch works to avoid being caught out if your app crashes for example.
An impressive and fast VPN service, Buffered VPN offers total online security and world-class customer support. The service boasts of providing access to content from any country in the world. This is achieved through the service’s server locations in 45 countries. It supports Windows, Linux and Mac platforms, but can also be set up on Android and iOS. The service offers excellent latencies and fast upload speeds, very good for browsing.
ExpressVPN scored well in our recent round of testing in terms of speed – we recorded around 8.5MB/s (68Mbit/s) via both FTP and HTTP in the UK, while Dutch endpoints gave us 6.3MB/s (50.4Mbit/s) via FTP and 7MB/s (56Mbit/s) via HTTP, more than enough for general browsing, streaming and downloading. US connection speeds, as you’d expect, were rather slower at 2.5MB/s (20Mbit/s) via FTP and a good 3.2MB/s (25.6Mbit/s) over HTTP.

In conjunction with information security experts at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), we reached out to our finalists with questions about their internal security practices. We asked how they handled internal security access, how they communicated securely with customers, in what ways they collected reports on security bugs, and of course whether their statements on logging policies matched their marketing and privacy policies. We also considered which companies had public-facing leadership or ownership, and which ones openly supported projects and organizations that promoted Internet security and privacy. (For a full breakdown of trust and VPNs, check out the section above.)
Torrenting has become a hot topic recently, as major production houses and record labels began to notice a significant drop in their profits. Although the practice has occurred for years, it wasn’t until it affected producer’s income that firms decided to take offense. Today, all over the world, torrenters are facing arrests, fines and legal warning for downloading a few songs, the latest season of a TV show, a movie or two, or even a book. The fuss made by the big media businesses has even encouraged certain governments to tighten laws around P2P file-sharing.

Things can get tricky when it comes to trusting a VPN. Recently, PureVPN handed over log information the company had to federal investigators building a case against a cyberstalker and general dirtbag. Some were surprised that the company had any information to hand over, or that it did cooperated with investigators at all. It seems to us that PureVPN stayed within the bounds of its stated privacy policy. But it's also true that other companies, such as Private Internet Access, aren't able to connect any of your personal information to your account information.
Are you so used to Wi-Fi that you've stopped worrying about your data as it travels over the air—and about who else might be spying on it or stealing it? If so, you're in the majority, and you ought to consider using a virtual private network, or VPN. In fact, when PCMag ran a survey on VPN usage, we found that a shocking 71 percent of the 1,000 respondents had never even used a VPN. Even among those who support net neutrality—who you might think would tend to be well informed on security and privacy issues—55 percent had never used a VPN.
The best use of a VPN is to add security to your connection when you’re on public Wi-Fi from someone you don’t know—at cafés, hotels, airports and airlines, and even car dealerships while you’re waiting for your vehicle’s fuel-line recombobulator to be replaced. A bad actor or mischievous network owner can intercept and steal your personal data on these types of networks. (If you need anecdotes to be properly worried, this article follows as a hacker collects private information on dozens of people connecting to an Amsterdam café’s Wi-Fi.) Though network security has changed since 2014, a more recent vulnerability shows that so too have the exploits and methods miscreants use to break it. A properly secured VPN can help deter this type of attack because it encrypts your connection starting with your computer, through the network, and out to the far-off VPN server.
The free version allows you to connect only one device, and you can use only one server in America – which will not work with Netflix, Hulu, or other popular streaming sites. You can still use it to access YouTube, Facebook, and other favorite social media sites that may be blocked. Plus, it’s compatible with all major operating systems, and it’s one of the fastest VPNs out there.
Protocol: When you’re researching a VPN, you’ll see terms like SSL/TLS (sometimes referred to as OpenVPN support,) PPTP, IPSec, L2TP, and other VPN types. We asked Samara Lynn, Lead Analyst for Networking and Small Business at PCMag, whether or not a user shopping for a VPN should shop for one over another. “SSL is what is commonly used these days. All of these protocols will provide a secure connection,” she explained, and pointed out that most solutions are invisible to the end-user anyway. Strictly, each protocol has its benefits and drawbacks, and if you’re concerned about this (specifically, PPTP vulnerabilities,) you’re probably already aware of them. Most users don’t need to be concerned about this—corporate users on the other hand, are probably all using IPSec or SSL clients anyway.
To verify that each service effectively hid our true IP address, we looked at a geolocation tool, DNS leaks, and IPv6 leaks. When connected to each service’s UK servers, we noted whether we could watch videos on BBC iPlayer, and using US servers we noted whether we could stream Netflix. We also visited the sites of Target, Yelp, Cloudflare, and Akamai to check whether our VPN IP addresses prevented us from accessing common sites that sometimes blacklist suspicious IP addresses.
Often, the most coveted benefit of using these services is increased privacy while using the internet. The software hides your actual IP address while substituting the IP from your selected provider in its place. This means that tracking your actual location is significantly more complex, and may even be impossible depending on the variable involved. In fact, since you can select the location of the server your traffic routes through, your connection can even appear to be coming from an entirely different country than its true.
VPNGate is a fantastic academic initiative out of Japan that aims to uncensor the web for people living under oppressive anti-free speech regimes. It uses a network of volunteer nodes around the world as relays. It discourages P2P filesharing activities that would hog the network, however, and it keeps logs for up to three months to help weed out abuse and criminal wrongdoing.
However, the law states that fines cannot be artificially high, so damages that copyright holders can exact are capped. Early in 2018, Netherlands’ privacy watchdog, Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens (AP), gave permission to Dutch Filmworks to collect IP addresses of anyone illegally downloading content. The company can hand out fines to users and have decided on a fee of 150 Euros per film.
Torrenting has also become one of the main forms of sharing files online. If you are looking for a quick VPN download for this purpose, then you have come to the right place. Torrenting itself is not inherently illegal, but it is important to check for the copyright holder’s consent before you use your VPN windows to download. In order to torrent without sharing your IP address, you can use one of the top VPNs like IPvanish for secure torrenting. You no longer have to lose sleep worrying that the government is snooping on your torrenting activity. It’s not at all difficult to look for a VPN for windows; just take a look at our pick of the best VPN for torrenting. You can find VPNs for the Ukraine, USA, UK, or almost any other country. 
TorGuard is considered one of the best torrent VPN providers in the industry for offering high torrent speeds and great online protection. They welcome torrent traffic on their network and keep zero records on all VPN servers. Your data is encrypted by using different encryption protocols. Evidently, the company goes a long way in protecting customers’ online privacy. Furthermore, they support Stealth VPN, offer a free anonymous email account, allow 5 simultaneous connections, and provides unlimited speeds and bandwidth.

With endpoints in 18 countries, Kaspersky Secure Connection can be set up so that it connects automatically, connects to an endpoint in a certain country by default, or seeks to establish a connection whenever you connect to an insecure Wi-Fi hotspot. You don’t, however get an automatic killswitch, so if your VPN connection goes south, you won’t be automatically disconnected.

YOU ARE ABOUT TO NAVIGATE AWAY FROM THE PRIVATE INTERNET ACCESS WEBSITE. The privacy policy of Private Internet Access is separate from that of the website you are navigating to and may ask for different or additional information from you. Please review the disclosure on the third-party website for detailed information regarding their privacy policy. If you do not agree with the Privacy Policy on the third-party’s website, you may return to the original payment page.
The more locations a VPN provider houses servers, the more flexible it is when you want to choose a server in a less-congested part of the world or geoshift your location. And the more servers it has at each location, the less likely they are to be slow when lots of people are using the service at the same time. Of course, limited bandwidth in and out of an area may still cause connections to lag at peak times even on the most robust networks.
Another often-overlooked security feature is a killswitch, which is essential for torrenters. If for any reason your VPN server stops working, a killswitch will sever your internet connection altogether so you’re not caught with your digital pants down. If a VPN provider doesn’t have a killswitch, using it for P2P is a terrible idea; all our picks have one that works.

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VPNs are primarily used to keep a shred of privacy while navigating the internet in an age where your every move is monitored. Search engines love to keep track of you for marketing purposes, and your ISP might even be using your browsing history to make a bit of profit. A VPN effectively blocks that from happening, and it can even help get past government restrictions if you're living in a less-than-free country. If you travel or frequent coffee shops, Wi-Fi hotspots can be easily compromised, but a VPN will keep your data safe.
Thus, VPNs with extra security measures are in demand. Other important criteria for choosing a VPN include a clear privacy policy, un-throttled bandwidth, fast download speeds, and value for money. Whether you’re looking for a VPN that’s extra secure with shared IP addresses, or simply the one that’s easiest to use, we’ve rounded up the best VPNs for torrenting so the only searching you have to do will be for content to share.
PIA is an established name in the VPN world and is among the cheapest of the well-known offerings, claiming to be the "highest quality for the lowest price." Designed for torrenting, PIA doesn’t monitor or restrict any connections including peer-to-peer file sharing and can be used with any torrenting client without the annoyance of being blocked or throttled.
Fergus is the chief editor and resident curmudgeon of Cloudwards.net. After finishing a degree in history at the University of Amsterdam he bid farewell to the cold northern climes and started a career as a newspaperman in the Far East. Realizing after a few years that online publishing is way more fun than the paper kind, he now bosses the team around over the internet and works himself into a lather on behalf of consumers everywhere. Contact him at fergus [at] cloudwards.net, though be warned that he has a very low tolerance for drivel.
Of course, there are more than just phones and computers in a home. Game systems, tablets, and smart home devices such as light bulbs and fridges all need to connect to the internet. Many of these things can't run VPN software on their own, nor can they be configured to connect to a VPN through their individual settings. In these cases, you may be better off configuring your router to connect with the VPN of your choice. By adding VPN protection to your router, you secure the traffic of every gadget connected to that router. And the router—and everything protected by it—uses just one of your licenses. Nearly all of the companies we have reviewed offer software for most consumer routers and even routers with preinstalled VPN software, making it even easier to add this level of protection.
VPN.ac is another great VPN for torrenting. It was created by a team of network security professionals with a focus on security and quality. Their server network is composed entirely of dedicated bare-metal servers offering excellent bandwidth and security. (Check out their real-time bandwidth stats by selecting VPN Nodes Status at the top of the site.)
Christian Cawley is a Deputy Editor at MakeUseOf, covering security, Linux, DIY and programming, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. Christian is a regular contributor to Linux User & Developer magazine, as well as specials including Raspberry Pi for Beginners, and Raspberry Pi for Kids. He's a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Android user, podcaster and foodie.
Given the aggressive pricing and marketing of other services that don’t measure up to our picks, IVPN’s most obvious downside may look like its price: At the time of this writing, the regular price for an annual IVPN subscription is $100 (about $8 per month). Promotions regularly bringing that down to $70 to $80 per year, but some services have regular pricing of half that. But you shouldn’t pay for a VPN you can’t trust, or one so slow or confusing that you avoid using it at all. We think IVPN’s combination of trust, security, and performance is worth the price. But if it’s too expensive for your needs, consider our budget pick instead.
PIA is based in the US, so is not a provider for the more NSA-phobic out there. However, it keeps no logs, which is a claim that it has been tested in a court of law! And although optional, its security can be first rate. Its desktop software supports multiple security options, a VPN kill switch, DNS leak protection, and port forwarding. Up to 5 simultaneous connections are permitted and the VPN boasts great connection speeds. P2P is permitted on all servers located across 29 countries.

Price-wise, Norton WiFi Privacy is pretty generous, too. A one-year subscription (for one device only), costs just £19.99 for the first year, and a 5-connection account costs £29.99 per year. However, the price jumps up after the first year, to £39.99 for 1 device and £59.99 for 5 devices. That’s still better than some, mind, but you may want to disable auto renewal, just in case.
One way to resolve the issue of trust is to be your own VPN provider, but that’s not a feasible option for most people, and it still requires trust in any company providing the hardware that your VPN would run on, such as Amazon’s cloud services. Multiple projects can help you cheaply turn any old server into a VPN, including Algo, Streisand, and Outline. By encrypting all the traffic from your home or mobile device to a server you manage, you deprive your ISP and a potentially villainous VPN of all your juicy traffic logs. But most people lack the skills, patience, or energy—or some combination of the three—to do this. If you don’t manage servers or work in IT, it may be harder to manage perfect operation and performance better than trustworthy professionals. Lastly, though you remove one threat from the equation by cutting out a VPN service provider, you also lose the extra layer of privacy that comes from your traffic mixing in with that of hundreds or thousands of other customers.
When we tested other aspects of IVPN’s performance, it also satisfied our requirements. On the default settings, our real IP address didn’t leak out via DNS requests or IPv6 routing, let alone a standard IP address checker. The DNS-requests check indicated that the app was using the company’s internal DNS servers and that they were correctly configured. None of the 12 services we tested disclosed our true IP address (though some showed mismatched IPs). Every VPN we considered had to operate its own DNS servers in-house and not rely on ISP servers or public options like Google’s, which give third parties a chance to log or analyze the sites you visit. IVPN currently disables all IPv6 connectivity, though the company is looking at solutions to securely support it soon. Most companies we considered do the same; OVPN was the only company to support IPv6 addresses at the time of our testing.
Not all VPN services require that you pay. There are, in fact, many excellent free VPNs. But all of the free VPNs we've tested have some kind of limitation. Some limit you to just a few simultaneous connections or devices on an account. Others restrict you to a few hundred MBs of data per day or per month. Others limit you to just a handful of servers. Still others do all of the above.
Even though Tor is free, we don’t think it’s the best option for most people. If you aren’t familiar with Tor, this handy interactive graphic shows how it protects an Internet connection, and this series goes into more detail about how Tor works. Runa Sandvik, a former researcher with The Tor Project who is now part of the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), described it as “a tool that allows users to remain anonymous and uncensored.” When we asked expert Alec Muffett about whether he personally used a VPN, he told us he actually spent most of his work time using Tor. But Tor has a reputation for slow connections, can be blocked by some websites, and isn’t suitable for some peer-to-peer applications like BitTorrent.
The service’s no logs policy means that it does not store user online activity data and promises not to release them unless required by law, ensuring that your information is in safe hands. What sets this service apart from others is its refund policy. Users are able to use it for up to 10 hours or 10GB of bandwith and still get a refund, a far more generous policy than what others have to offer.

The specific steps involved in setting things up differ from service to service. Your specific provider likely has a dedicated section on their website devoted to explaining how to carry through with the process. For example, here’s how to do this if you’re with ExpressVPN and here’s PIA. We also have an example demonstration of how it’s done on most DD-WRT routers on this page (near the bottom).


Remote-access VPNs come in two forms. One is a network access server (NAS), which is a dedicated server, or an application running on a shared server. In this case, users need to connect to the NAS over the Internet to access the VPN. Users key in their credentials to access the VPN, which is validated by the NAS either by using a separate authentication server or its own authentication process.
Speed-wise, when connected to VPNHub’s UK and Netherlands endpoints, our FTP and HTTP downloads came in at around 10MB/s (80Mbit/s). Connecting to U.S. endpoints gave us 4.8MB/s (38.4Mbit/s) via FTP and 4.2MB/s (33.6Mbit/s) via HTTP. While that’s good enough for everyday browsing and streaming, your results may vary – we connected to U.S Netflix no problem, but, as with many VPNs on this list, BBC iPlayer promptly showed us the door.

Your ISP may already be involved in some of these spying operations, but there's an even-newer concern. The FCC has rolled back Obama-era rules that sought to protect net neutrality, and in doing so allowed ISPs to profit off your data. The ISPs wanted a slice of that big data monetization pie that has fueled the growth of companies like Facebook and Google. Those companies are able to gather huge amounts of information about users, and then use it to target advertising or even sell that data to other companies. ISPs now have the green light to bundle anonymized user data and put it up for sale.
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) provides you with a direct, encrypted connection to a private network via the internet. In business, they’re widely used to allow remote workers to securely access their employer’s office network as though they were physically connected to it. However, the desire for online privacy has led to the rise of consumer-oriented VPN tunnelling services which, rather than connecting to a remote private network, route your internet connection via a remote server. These services provide both a way of encrypting and anonymising your internet use and of appearing to be located in another country.
As for security, the Panama-based provider prides itself with military-grade 256-bit encryption, an automatic kill switch (which prevents your data from being exposed should a VPN connection unexpectedly drop), as well as double data encryption, meaning your data goes through two separate VPN servers. In addition, NordPVN has a strict no-logs policy, so your private information is safe from prying eyes.

Despite Proton’s strong reputation for privacy with both its VPN and Mail services, we previously dismissed ProtonVPN without testing because it didn’t offer native applications for major operating systems. Instead, the service relied on third-party applications that could be clumsy to set up and lacked important features. Now that ProtonVPN apps are fully supported on Windows, Mac, and Android, we’re looking forward to testing the service for the next update.


Torrent users looks two things in any VPN they want to use. First the number of servers a vpn provides and secondly the price of the VPN software. Express VPN provides thousands of servers which are comparatively fast and secured by encryption. While torrenting our main concentration is our privacy and expressVPN integrated DNS leak protection and kill switch features so that you don’t need to worry about unwanted notices from ISP or Corporations.
The best use of a VPN is to add security to your connection when you’re on public Wi-Fi from someone you don’t know—at cafés, hotels, airports and airlines, and even car dealerships while you’re waiting for your vehicle’s fuel-line recombobulator to be replaced. A bad actor or mischievous network owner can intercept and steal your personal data on these types of networks. (If you need anecdotes to be properly worried, this article follows as a hacker collects private information on dozens of people connecting to an Amsterdam café’s Wi-Fi.) Though network security has changed since 2014, a more recent vulnerability shows that so too have the exploits and methods miscreants use to break it. A properly secured VPN can help deter this type of attack because it encrypts your connection starting with your computer, through the network, and out to the far-off VPN server.

And they manage to do all of this without sacrificing performance, offering one of the fastest download speeds (83 Mbps out of 100 Mbps) and the best 24/7 customer support in the industry. The only downside? It’s a little on the pricey side, with monthly plans starting between $6.67 and $12.95/mo. But it’s a small price to pay for excellent performance in almost every category.
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