Companies invest thousands of dollars in advanced tracking software that monitors your behavior, collates information, and then provides them with data for market research and more. This is how spam emails are able to make their way into our inboxes, and how we end up finding our email addresses signed up to online mailing lists that we’ve never even heard of.
For the uninitiated, torrenting is a way of sharing files peer-to-peer (P2P). A single user uploads a file, which is broken up into smaller pieces called "packets". These packets are then distributed to everyone downloading the same file (leechers). Once the file download is complete on the downloader's end, the packet is then distributed among other leechers. This makes the transfer of big files faster and more secure as smaller packets are being transferred from various locations (rather than in one big chunk from a single server). It's like a huge network of little bricklayers anonymously working together to construct the file that ends up on your computer – which, if you're in Australia, is probably the latest episode of Game of Thrones.

Are you so used to Wi-Fi that you've stopped worrying about your data as it travels over the air—and about who else might be spying on it or stealing it? If so, you're in the majority, and you ought to consider using a virtual private network, or VPN. In fact, when PCMag ran a survey on VPN usage, we found that a shocking 71 percent of the 1,000 respondents had never even used a VPN. Even among those who support net neutrality—who you might think would tend to be well informed on security and privacy issues—55 percent had never used a VPN.
Some VPNs offer “split tunneling,” which routes all traffic through your VPN except specific services or sites that you allow. For example, you might want to send your Web traffic through your VPN but stream Netflix on your fast, domestic connection. But these types of rules are complicated to implement without also leaking other important information, and we didn’t assess how effective they were in practice.
VPN is a complete solution for torrent lovers to download unlimited torrent files including books, movies, free music and software etc. Torrent VPN is the only way through which the torrent files can be downloaded without any fear of getting caught where you don’t need to be worried about DMCA and copyright policy of your country and internet services providers because their systems will not recognize your torrent related activities. VPN torrent hides your original IP address and assigned you a temporary IP address to surf internet and download torrent anonymously.
The only downsides to Private Internet Access are that you can't select your own username — you've got to stick with an assigned random ID — and that you've occasionally got to reinstall a balky driver in Windows. (There's a button to do this.) Selecting Private Internet Access as our VPN service of choice was almost a no-brainer, but because it's based in the U.S., anyone wary of the FBI may want to consider another service.
When we ran our recent Hive Five on VPN service providers, we heard from VPN providers begging to be included, angry CEOs who claimed their company was maliciously left out, and others accusing some of the contenders of illegal or unethical behavior. We took at look at the poll and the claims, and while there’s no definitive proof the poll was gamed, we decided to come up with our own top five, based on our own research rather than reader feedback, that are great whether you’re the privacy advocate, the student, or the downloader.

There are three variables to consider depending on your needs. If you love bypassing regional locks and want to view Netflix without borders, only a handful of VPNs can successfully bypass the watchful eye of Netflix. The second variable is P2P access. Some VPNs specialize in optimizing P2P service, so that’s something to consider if you regularly transfer large files on torrent sites.
If you’re not so keen to download a dedicated free VPN app, why not try the Opera browser? Since mid-2016 it has shipped with its own VPN, enabling users to easily bypass region blocking and keep their online transactions secure. It may not be the fastest VPN — and it’s unsuitable for streaming Netflix or torrenting — but Opera VPN is a very popular free choice. Indeed, we’re expecting other browsers to follow suit quite soon.
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If you’re going to use torrents, however, life is easier if you use a VPN—especially if the network you’re on blocks torrenting. There are many VPNs among our top picks that could be used for downloading torrents, but our preferred choice is Private Internet Access. This no-frills VPN has an absolute ton of servers, good speeds, and a nice amount of country locations to remain relatively anonymous. (Read our full review.) The price is right at less than $40 a year, and its privacy policies have been tested in court. Plus, advanced users can adjust their level of encryption for data encryption, data authentication, and handshake.
If HTTP browsing is a postcard that anyone can read as it travels along, HTTPS (HTTP Secure) is a sealed letter that gives up only where it’s going. For example, before Wirecutter implemented HTTPS, your traffic could reveal the exact page you visited (such as https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-portable-vaporizer/) and its content to the owner of the Wi-Fi network, your network administrator, or your ISP. But if you visit that same page today—our website now uses HTTPS—those parties would see only the domain (https://thewirecutter.com). The downside is that HTTPS has to be implemented by the website operator. Sites that deal with banking or shopping have been using these types of secure connections for a long time to protect financial data, and in the past few years, many major news and information sites, including Wirecutter and the site of our parent company, The New York Times, have implemented it as well.
VPNArea is one of the few providers that offer dedicated IP addresses in various countries around the world, as listed on their website. They also allow account sharing (six simultaneous connections permitted). VPNArea continues to improve and remains an excellent choice for privacy-focused users. Check out their discount pricing for annual plans. [Learn more >]
Not all VPN services require that you pay. There are, in fact, many excellent free VPNs. But all of the free VPNs we've tested have some kind of limitation. Some limit you to just a few simultaneous connections or devices on an account. Others restrict you to a few hundred MBs of data per day or per month. Others limit you to just a handful of servers. Still others do all of the above.

ExpressVPN is incredibly fast and super secure, and it can unblock just about any site or service on the internet - including Netflix, Hulu, BBC, and more - with impressive streaming capabilities. It offers servers in over 90 countries, and the 24/7 live chat support is one of the friendliest and most professional. ExpressVPN gives a strong fight to NordVPN, while other VPNs lag behind.
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When you connect to a VPN, you create a secure, encrypted tunnel between your computer and the VPN remote server. The data is essentially gibberish to anyone who intercepts it. Your ISP, government or hackers won’t know which websites you visit. And conversely, the websites you visit won’t know where you are. Typically, logging in to a VPN is as easy as entering a password and clicking a button on a VPN client or a web browser extension.

YourBittorrent has a somewhat controversial history. While founded in 2009, it really began operation in its original form in 2003 as a collaboration between two partners — the product of which was myBittorrent; one of the partners wanted the website eventually shut down while the other partner wanted it to become bigger. This led to a split, the product of which is YourBittorrent.
BitTorrent's dubious distinction as the pirate's tool of choice has led to indiscriminate crackdowns from ISPs on the use of BitTorrent. With a virtual private network, or VPN, your traffic is encrypted and secured to ensure that no one can see what you're up to—even when you're torrenting. The catch is, not every VPN service allows BitTorrent on its servers.
In our exchanges with security expert Alec Muffett, he suggested, “Some privacy activists expend great effort in ‘hiding from the man,’ where ‘the man’ really doesn’t care about them. So they just make excess work for themselves.” Bill McKinley, head of the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), went further, saying, “If you really feel that what you’re doing online is that valuable to government x, then you probably shouldn’t be leveraging the Internet.” We’re not saying it’s hopeless, but even if you seriously overhaul how you conduct your activities online, there are no guarantees you won’t get caught up in a database somewhere.
Through years of reporting and the Snowden leaks, we now know that the NSA's surveillance apparatus is enormous in scope. At one point, the agency had the ability to intercept and analyze just about every transmission being sent over the web. There are jaw-dropping stories about secret rooms inside data infrastructure hubs, from which the agency had direct access to the beating heart of the internet. With a VPN, you can rest assured that your data is encrypted and less directly traceable back to you. Given the mass surveillance efforts by the NSA and others, having more ways to encrypt your data is a good thing.
The service’s no logs policy means that it does not store user online activity data and promises not to release them unless required by law, ensuring that your information is in safe hands. What sets this service apart from others is its refund policy. Users are able to use it for up to 10 hours or 10GB of bandwith and still get a refund, a far more generous policy than what others have to offer.
There's a reason why all these VPNs are paid. Providing encryption and VPN services to millions of users is a resource-intensive work that requires servers across the world. A free VPN might be enough for something minor like checking foreign news occasionally. If you need a VPN on a regular basis, however, you’re better off with a reliable paid service.
VPNs are a way for users to win back some control. Remember: All of your information and activity is known to your ISP because of your IP address. By changing your IP address, you can sidestep your ISP and mask your internet activity. A VPN lets you do that by routing your activity through its own servers. To anyone looking at your activity, you’ll have a new IP address that could be in a different state or even a different country. 
To be honest, the monthly billing is expensive, that’s for sure. Even so, you can sign up for a free trial if you’re not sure you want to make the long-term commitment. You just have to dig a bit around the site, as it’s not visibly presented (we recommend Google search for ‘NordPVN free trial’). Although the monthly pricing may not be suitable for everyone, we can assure you the rest of the paid subscriptions are rather fairly priced. The limited three-year plan gives you the best value for money. 
TorGuard is considered one of the best torrent VPN providers in the industry for offering high torrent speeds and great online protection. They welcome torrent traffic on their network and keep zero records on all VPN servers. Your data is encrypted by using different encryption protocols. Evidently, the company goes a long way in protecting customers’ online privacy. Furthermore, they support Stealth VPN, offer a free anonymous email account, allow 5 simultaneous connections, and provides unlimited speeds and bandwidth.
If you are looking for a budget-friendly option for a torrenting VPN, PrivateVPN is one of the best ones there is. If you are going for the annual plan, you will see that this is one of the most affordable VPNs. But the low price tag does not mean the service compromises your security. It flaunts a strict zero-logs policy. The encryption is mighty and you also get a built-in kill switch.

TrackStop – Ads are basically advanced tracking to record your browsing, so you can be hit with targeted ads based on your online activity. To protect users against this threat, Perfect Privacy developed TrackStop, which is a powerful filter that blocks advertising, tracking, and malicious domains at the VPN server level. It ranked the best among different VPN ad blockers I tested.


Panama-based NordVPN keeps neither connection nor traffic logs. 256-bit AES encryption with perfect forward secrecy is the default, along with optional double-hop encryption and Tor over VPN features. Speeds are great, but can be a bit volatile. DNS leak protection and a kill switch can both be toggled on in the settings. The traditional all-or-nothing kill switch is one option, or you can specify which programs get cut off from the internet if the VPN connection drops, such as a BitTorrent client.
Our picks for the best VPN services for torrenting allow you to use P2P software in private. Our top-class proprietary speed testing tool allows us to monitor VPN speeds in loads of countries worldwide, so you can be sure you won’t be sacrificing speed for the sake of security. Hands-on testing reveals which services have the best apps and privacy features.
Price: proXPN has a free plan, which limits your transfer speeds to 300kpbs and restricts you to one exit location (Miami) in the United States. Premium accounts unlock support for PPTP (if you want to connect a mobile device or a router,) remove the transfer cap, and allows you to choose from any of the company’s other exit locations. Premium plans start at $10/mo, and you can read more about their pricing and plans here.
Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) was initially developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for IPv6, which was required in all standards-compliant implementations of IPv6 before RFC 6434 made it only a recommendation.[7] This standards-based security protocol is also widely used with IPv4 and the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol. Its design meets most security goals: authentication, integrity, and confidentiality. IPsec uses encryption, encapsulating an IP packet inside an IPsec packet. De-encapsulation happens at the end of the tunnel, where the original IP packet is decrypted and forwarded to its intended destination.
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) allows you to connect to the internet via a privately encrypted network. The network acts as a private gateway between your computer or mobile device and the internet. There are a whole host of VPN servers that you can choose from all over the world. So you can make it seem as though you are browsing from another country or location entirely. With a VPN you can not only fool your internet server into thinking you are browsing from a different geographical location, but also totally hide your IP address and make all of your internet activity anonymous.
Since we're living in a connected world, security and privacy are critical to ensure our personal safety from nefarious hacks. From online banking to communicating with coworkers on a daily basis, we're now frequently transferring data on our computers and smartphones. It's extremely important to find ways of securing our digital life and for this reason, VPNs have become increasingly common.
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