And they manage to do all of this without sacrificing performance, offering one of the fastest download speeds (83 Mbps out of 100 Mbps) and the best 24/7 customer support in the industry. The only downside? It’s a little on the pricey side, with monthly plans starting between $6.67 and $12.95/mo. But it’s a small price to pay for excellent performance in almost every category.
The only downsides to Private Internet Access are that you can't select your own username — you've got to stick with an assigned random ID — and that you've occasionally got to reinstall a balky driver in Windows. (There's a button to do this.) Selecting Private Internet Access as our VPN service of choice was almost a no-brainer, but because it's based in the U.S., anyone wary of the FBI may want to consider another service.
Hotspot Shield VPN works in most countries, but that doesn’t mean it’s always legal to use a VPN in a specific country. If you have any doubts about the legality of using a VPN in a certain country, always consult a qualified lawyer because laws can change quickly. If you’re still unsure, then it’s best to play it safe and abide by the most conservative guidelines of a country.
Aside from the highly practical, there are other benefits to using a VPN for gaming. Many video games offer country-exclusive content. Gamers hate this, as it essentially bars them from improving or upgrading their games with cool extras, but because these software’s can spoof your location, you can access all downloadable content, no matter where in the world you are.
Call us idealistic, but at ZenMate we strive towards providing people around the globe with a free and unrestricted internet. Are you tired of seeing geo-restriction messages while surfing the web with your Chrome browser? Yawn, we definitely are. And we want you to be able to access your favorite home content while abroad. Connect to any of our 30+ server locations worldwide and enjoy total freedom online with ZenMate VPN. You can change the rules of the web with just one click. Be a vigilante.
If you’re unsure about whether you should get a VPN, check out our post that explains what a VPN is and when one makes sense as a privacy and security tool. But most people leave their privacy and security vulnerable in ways that can be addressed with methods other than signing up for a VPN—methods that are potentially more effective. If you have a drafty house with paper-thin walls and halogen light bulbs, you’d get far more value out of every dollar by sealing up cracks, insulating, and switching to LEDs than you would by putting solar panels on your roof. Similarly, before you rush to sign up for a VPN subscription, you should consider these other ways to up your privacy game.
For two years running, Private Internet Access has performed the best in our network tests and remained the cheapest full-fledged VPN service we've tried. It has more than 3,000 servers worldwide, supports platforms ranging from Windows and Mac to open-source routers, and lets you customize your tunneling and encryption protocols. You can pay in bitcoin, and you don't have to provide your real name.
When we tested other aspects of IVPN’s performance, it also satisfied our requirements. On the default settings, our real IP address didn’t leak out via DNS requests or IPv6 routing, let alone a standard IP address checker. The DNS-requests check indicated that the app was using the company’s internal DNS servers and that they were correctly configured. None of the 12 services we tested disclosed our true IP address (though some showed mismatched IPs). Every VPN we considered had to operate its own DNS servers in-house and not rely on ISP servers or public options like Google’s, which give third parties a chance to log or analyze the sites you visit. IVPN currently disables all IPv6 connectivity, though the company is looking at solutions to securely support it soon. Most companies we considered do the same; OVPN was the only company to support IPv6 addresses at the time of our testing.
Other encryption protocols add another layer of security by encrypting your data multiple times. While your data is more secure, your speed will suffer as the VPN works to decrypt multiple layers of encryption. Think of it like a handshake. A secret handshake gets you through the door of a popular nightclub if that’s the policy. It’s a quick, but effective way to determine if you should have access to the club. But if the club requires multiple handshakes, that’ll take more time as you pass through all the security checks.
Even if a company is at fault for deceptive marketing practices, it still has to comply with legal requests for whatever information it does have. Jerome told us, “In the U.S., however, there is a big difference between a request for data regularly stored for business purposes and a demand that a company retain information. VPN providers are not required to keep records just in case law enforcement might need them some day.” That means many companies could provide a list of their customers, but if they practice what they preach when it comes to no-logging policies, innocent customers looking for privacy shouldn’t get swept up in these requests.
The main drawback is that VPN.ac maintains connection logs for network security, which they clearly explain on their website. These logs do not include any browsing or activity, but instead, basic connection data and everything is erased daily. All support inquiries are handled internally by the network security professionals who run the service (no third-party support). [Learn more >]
Besides the obvious dangers of faceless cyber criminals emptying your bank account, we find out more and more about the extent of the risks everyone faces on the web. Votes are being influenced, news is being faked, search engines are being trained to know more about you than your best friend. We don’t think this is right, and we actually think it is very dangerous. Download ZenMate VPN now and lock your private information up - your Chrome browser security matters!
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