In Switzerland as opposed to the US, anyone seeking information will have to go to the courts with probable cause for a proper court order, not just present secret threats from the FBI. Don't trust any VPN headquartered in the US or one of the five eyes nations. I suggest visiting the torrent freak web site and search for anonymous and VPN and read the article that comes up.
NordVPN doesn’t keep logs of online activity. This means that your private data, online activity, and browsing history can’t be monitored, gathered, exposed, or intercepted by third parties. Users can also select DNS leak protection to protect their IP address and an automatic kill switch, which either kills all programs or chosen programs if the VPN connection drops. This protects a user’s personal data from being temporarily exposed. There’s also ad-blocking functionality and protection against phishing threats.
Hide.me is a premium non-logging VPN service. Their prices are higher than most (if you want the top plan which allows 5 simultaneous connections) but the think I absolutely love (besides the uncrowded servers) is the fact that every single server location has SOCKS5 proxy access. Any one of these can be used with your favorite torrent client, from any of their 20+ server locations.
CyberGhost has more than 1100 Servers worldwide in 50 countries, making it easy for users to find a fast and secure connection. It does not collect any user data and all traffic information are protected by 128-encryption. Speed is fairly fast, allowing users to stream content, download files and do online shopping. The service comes in three plans, a one-month plan, a six-month plan or an annual package.
This is all great, you may be thinking, but a VPN seems like a bit much. As long as you don’t do anything illegal online you having nothing to worry about, right? Unfortunately, it is that kind of thinking that enables legislators to continue to create laws that violate your online rights. As long as there is valuable data to harvest from online activity, someone is willing to put your information at risk.
Trusting a VPN is a hard choice, but IVPN’s transparency goes a long way toward proving that its customers’ privacy is a priority. Founder and CEO Nick Pestell answered all our questions about the company’s internal security, and even described the tools the company used to limit and track access to secure servers. The top VPN services gave us a variety of answers to these questions, some of which were frustratingly vague. ExpressVPN was the only other company to outline these controls and assure us that these policies were well-documented and not half-practiced.
All that being said, we currently name TorGuard as the fastest VPN service. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests. Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect.
Privacy aside, speed is a huge factor when finding the right VPN for you. You will never use a VPN if your internet speed is more of a crawl than a sprint. Find a VPN with a lot of local servers and check to see what speeds they are guaranteeing. Do your research, read reviews, and test it out for yourself. Most VPN services have money-back policies, so give those a spin.
If VPN connections get blocked by your network because of strict network management or government censorship, TorGuard offers a “stealth” connection to avoid deep packet inspection. Specifically, TorGuard uses Stunnel (a clever portmanteau of SSL and tunnel) to add an extra layer of encryption and make your traffic look like normal, secure Web traffic. If you’re having connection issues, you can enable Stunnel with a checkbox on the main application window, but only if you select TCP from the protocol list. (Otherwise, the box is unclickable, with no explanation as to why.)
World's most trusted VPN provider, hide.me, with over 5 million downloads now offers newly enhanced VPN Apps for all Devices and Operating systems with Free VPN. It's as easy as 123, No Registration, No Login required. Just download and enjoy the fastest VPN in the world. hide.me VPN App offers Wi-Fi security, online privacy, as well as access to all blocked content & apps.

When we initially researched and tested VPNs for this guide in early 2018, technical and legal reasons prevented app developers from using the OpenVPN protocol in apps released through Apple’s iOS app store. During 2018, both the technical and licensing hurdles were removed, and VPN providers started adding OpenVPN connections to their iOS apps. We’ve already noted that our top pick, IVPN, has added it, as have ExpressVPN and PIA. In a future update, we’ll specifically test these upgraded iOS apps, but in the meantime the updated IVPN app has worked as promised for several Wirecutter staffers who use it regularly. Because this OpenVPN support makes it much easier for anyone with Apple devices to create a reliably secure VPN connection, we wouldn’t recommend a service without it to anyone with an iPhone or iPad.
This means that copyright holders can identify you without lifting a finger. All they need to do is sit back, wait for you to start downloading a file and decide whether or not they want to take action. Your internet service provider can also quickly identify your activity and may throttle your internet connection, or hand your details over to a ‘copyright troll’.
With TorGuard, anonymity is the name of the game, so copyright pirates as well as Usenet fans and deep web visitors have nothing to worry about using the service. The downside is that TorGuard’s best servers need to be subscribed to separately, which will set you back a few extra dollars per month on top of the subscription fee. Then again, that could be worth it.
HTTPS is a powerful tool that everyone should use because it helps keep sensitive browsing private at no extra cost to the people using it. But like most security standards, it has its own problems too. That little lock icon in your browser bar, which indicates the HTTPS connection, relies on a certificate “signed” by a recognized authority. But there are hundreds of such authorities, and as the EFF says, “the security of HTTPS is only as strong as the practices of the least trustworthy/competent CA [certificate authorities].” Plus, there have been plenty of news stories covering minor and even major vulnerabilities in the system. Some security professionals have worried about those least-competent authorities, spurring groups to improve on the certificate standards and prompting browsers to add warnings when you come across certificates and sites that don’t withstand scrutiny. So HTTPS is good—but like anything, it isn’t perfect.
Taking an unusual approach to pricing, ProtonVPN has a low-speed, free service, as well as a trio of premium options. The Basic package is $5/month; the Plus package $10/month, and adds dedicated servers, added security, and Tor servers to the mix. Finally, the Visionary package costs $30 monthly, features the additional servers mentioned, and adds ProtonMail.
PureVPN has a huge choice of 750 servers in 141 countries and counting. The sheer volume of features, toggles, and tools they provide makes it a top contender for the advanced users. There is a stealth browsing mode, online banking security, secure FTP access, multiple protocols and more. They have server lists optimized for P2P and video streaming, so switching is easy.

With TorGuard, anonymity is the name of the game, so copyright pirates as well as Usenet fans and deep web visitors have nothing to worry about using the service. The downside is that TorGuard’s best servers need to be subscribed to separately, which will set you back a few extra dollars per month on top of the subscription fee. Then again, that could be worth it.


When choosing your VPN, do your research and mind the legal aspects. Countries like Germany, France or Japan are cracking down on copyright infringement, while the members of the 14 Eyes treaty have draconian data retention laws and extensive surveillance. So, if you’re looking to maximize your privacy, you might want to avoid connecting to servers in those countries.
Hi Paula, thanks for the question. File sharing is indeed under fire in countries like the US, UK, Canada and Australia. But you can engage in P2P/File-sharing activity from these countries by connecting to the VPN servers of the countries where File Shharing is legal. As long as you don’t engage in any copyright infringements, you have nothing to worry about. However, anti-file-sharing measures are usually very limited and are usually always preceeded by rather harmless warning notices by the ISP so you have a bit of a margin in case you ever get flagged during a P2P session in the event of a worst case scenario.
ExpressVPN is another excellent option for torrenting and P2P downloads. This British Virgin Islands-based service has a great lineup of custom applications and it also performed very well in testing for the ExpressVPN review. ExpressVPN offers strong protections for customer data with a solid no logs policy, very secure applications, and offshore jurisdiction.
I often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.
VPNs cover several different security needs. They offer protection from mass government surveillance, in addition to protection from hackers on public networks. This means that you cannot be targeted by major governmental organizations like the NSA or even small-time cyber criminals just looking to steal your banking information. This is accomplished by routing all of the information you send and receive through a third-party server that encrypts it and keeps it safe.
On top of all that, with a VPN, you don’t have to worry about being hacked. You can watch your favorite shows from anywhere in the world and smoothly bypass government censorship. In short, you’ll need a VPN to protect your online activities and for unrestricted internet access. A VPN is the only way to gain access to the full scope of the world wide web.
One of the biggest things that can put people off the idea of using a VPN is that they slow down your internet. This is mainly because you are adding an extra leg to the journey your data must take to reach its destination (via the VPN server). These days good VPN services are very fast and if you connect to a server near to you, you will often get 90% or more of your raw internet connection speed. 
The specific steps involved in setting things up differ from service to service. Your specific provider likely has a dedicated section on their website devoted to explaining how to carry through with the process. For example, here’s how to do this if you’re with ExpressVPN and here’s PIA. We also have an example demonstration of how it’s done on most DD-WRT routers on this page (near the bottom).
Control channel: an AES-256-GCM cipher with RSA-8192 handshake encryption. Additional authentication is not required with GCM, but HMAC SHA384 hash authentication is also specified in the encryption suite. Perfect Forward Secrecy is " is enabled by default." I will assume this means a standard Diffie-Hellman Exchange (DHE) is used, but it may be higher.
I often receive emails asking about the interplay between VPNs and BitTorrent. Some of them have included admissions of piracy, and even justifications for it. One reader bemoaned the difficulty in finding legal avenues for material that is out of print or just hard to obtain or not available for sale in a given locale. We sympathize. The state of the public domain has been woefully neglected, and market forces and regional distribution deals often keep worthy art and materials out of the hands of those who want it, even if they are willing to pay for it. But no matter how just the reasoning, the law (however problematic) is the law. ISPs and, yes, other web companies, are often compelled to answer when rights holders come with a list of offenses carried out on their data infrastructure.
Beyond those two factors, it’s difficult to make blanket statements about what makes a trustworthy VPN. At the bare minimum, a good VPN provider should not collect and keep any logs of its customers’ browsing history. If it does, that puts your privacy at risk should someone access (or even release) those logs without authorization. But deciding when to a trust a logging policy isn’t easy. As the EFF points out, “Some VPNs with exemplary privacy policies could be run by devious people.” You don’t need to have done anything illegal to prefer that law enforcement and criminals alike not have access to a browsing history that may include your bank, medical websites, or that one thing you looked at around 2 a.m. that one time.
Depending on how ISPs respond to a newly deregulated environment, a VPN could tunnel traffic past any choke points or blockades thrown up by ISPs. That said, an obvious response would be to block or throttle all VPN traffic. Or perhaps ISPs will come up with an entirely novel way to monetize the letitude given them by the current lack of net neutrality legislation.
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