A good VPN service offers more than 700 servers across the globe, with diverse server locations. A robust VPN service has more than 1,000 servers. The kings of the heap as far as servers go are NordVPN, Private Internet Access, and TorGuard VPN. NordVPN offers over 4,800 servers, and the other two have over 3,000 servers for subscribers. All three have a good mix of locations to boot.

The actual location of a VPN company also matters, as it can inform what protections are afforded to customers. Hide My Ass has its company headquarters in London, and operates under the legal jurisdiction of England and Wales. Notably, the UK at large does have mandatory data retention laws. That's not ideal. Many other VPN services operate in countries without mandatory data retention laws, or in ones that have favorable privacy protections for consumers.
The highest level is Hide.me Premium, which costs $9.99 per month and is what I have tested here, as it's most in line with the plans I've tested for other VPN services. That's less than the current industry average of $10.50 per month, making Hide.me an attractive deal. The Premium tier includes all of the features from the Plus accounts, but completely removes the data cap. It also raises the device limit to five. That's the industry average, but NordVPN offers six devices and CyberGhost offers seven. TorGuard goes even further, providing you a slider to simply pick the number of devices you need and then charging you accordingly.
We’re so used to sharing our private information online, and entering passwords and credit cards information. But do we ever stop and think, “who else can see this?” or, “can someone hack this network?” The truth is, a regular internet network isn’t particularly safe, and public Wi-Fi networks are even worse. If you demand total online anonymity, then your best bet is a VPN.

It usually relies on either Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to secure the connection. However, SSL VPNs can also be used to supply secure access to a single application, rather than an entire internal network. Some VPNs also provide Layer 2 access to the target network; these will require a tunneling protocol like PPTP (Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol) or L2TP (Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol) running across the base IPsec connection.
A VPN masks your IP address so that other devices in the swarm only see the IP address of the P2P VPN server. The best VPNs for torrenting typically use shared IP addresses, meaning dozens and even hundreds of users are assigned the same IP address. This large pool of users makes it next to impossible to trace torrenting activity back to a single person. Furthermore, if you use one of the logless VPNs on this list, the VPN provider won’t have any user information to hand over when hit with a DMCA notice or settlement letter.
HMA! Pro VPN is a leading internet encryption service based on virtual private network technology. Whilst VPN’s are predominantly used to remotely connect people to localized computer networks, the underlying security advantages in the form of encryption can be used to provide online security and privacy services. Consumers and businesses connect to HMA’s worldwide VPN servers to tunnel their internet connections through HMA's servers to achieve increased security and privacy.
Using a web Proxy server allows you to access content that may be blocked or restricted by local governments. You can use one to gain access to these websites and content. It also allows you to surf the web more privately meaning what your browsing (in that tab only) cannot be tracked. However, your connection is not encrypted unless you use a VPN.
I don't believe it is possible to make a determination about the benefits of a company based solely on its location. However, it is important to understand the laws and policies at work in a company with such intimate access to your information. I encourage readers to consider this information, and choose a VPN service with which they can feel comfortable.
Windscribe  offers unlimited device connections. Yes you heard that right! The reason is that unlike the others above on this list, it doesn't offer unlimited data. So you're limited by bandwidth and data, not by devices. You get 10GB every month, and there's a free plan also but that only allows one device. There are apps for Windows, Mac and iOS but not Android, and the service also offers browser add-ons with useful features such as ad-blocking. Short range performance (to US sites) is good, but we noticed lag with transatlantic connections. However, if you’re looking to protect the data from a whole bunch of devices - an office, perhaps, or just a smart home - the support for unlimited connections is a real stand-out feature.

Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP)/IPsec: The L2TP and IPsec protocols combine their best individual features to create a highly secure VPN client. Since L2TP isn't capable of encryption, it instead generates the tunnel while the IPSec protocol handles encryption, channel security, and data integrity checks to ensure all of the packets have arrived and that the channel has not been compromised.
Given the aggressive pricing and marketing of other services that don’t measure up to our picks, IVPN’s most obvious downside may look like its price: At the time of this writing, the regular price for an annual IVPN subscription is $100 (about $8 per month). Promotions regularly bringing that down to $70 to $80 per year, but some services have regular pricing of half that. But you shouldn’t pay for a VPN you can’t trust, or one so slow or confusing that you avoid using it at all. We think IVPN’s combination of trust, security, and performance is worth the price. But if it’s too expensive for your needs, consider our budget pick instead.
Our next pick for best VPN of 2018 is IPVanish. The service permits torrenting and throws in a free Smart DNS service for all customers. The biggest downside is that it’s based in the US —not an ideal location since the NSA is notorious for its intensive and often illegal surveillance. To combat this, IPVanish doesn’t keep logs and does provide DNS leak protection. Despite being a little stripped-down, works very well.
Here at IPVanish, we believe you shouldn’t have to sacrifice the privacy of one device for another. That’s why every IPVanish plan supplies ten concurrent connections. You can connect to our VPN service on up to ten devices at the same time — enough protection for the whole family. And with our automatic apps and VPN routers, you’ll be able to encrypt every internet-enabled device you own.
As part of our research, we also make sure to find out where the company is based and under what legal framework it operates. Some countries don't have data-retention laws, making it easier to keep a promise of "We don't keep any logs." It's also useful to know under what circumstances a VPN company will hand over information to law enforcement and what information it would have to provide if that should happen.
Torrent and VPN are two things but a VPN services which allow you to download torrent files is called torrent VPN. The purpose of VPN torrent is to allow their customers to take full advantage of internet. Most of VPN companies does not allow P2P file sharing network and torrent downloading because its effect the internet speed for their other users. That’s why, you need to purchase torrent VPN to download torrent files and share files through P2P networks.
Buffered VPN doesn't disclose much about the size of its network, but the 30-day money back guarantee means that you can take their service for a test drive and really get a feel for how well it performs for you. The company lost a few points from us because they do keep some connection information. They gained points for their client support, unlimited bandwidth, and generous number of simultaneous sessions allowed.

Like NordVPN, it also has all the must-have features for P2P traffic, but with one caveat: if you want more than the standard 256-bit encryption you’re going to have to mess with the configuration files yourself. Doing so can up your encryption as high as 4096 bits (that’s ridiculously secure), but it does require getting your hands a little dirty.


DNS servers are a bit like the phone books of the Internet: You can type in “thewirecutter.com,” for instance, and one of the many DNS servers behind the scenes can point you to the IP address of a server hosting the site. Most of the time, your DNS requests automatically route through your ISP, giving the ISP an easy way to monitor your traffic. Some VPN services rely on third-party DNS servers, but the best ones keep DNS servers in-house to prevent your browsing history, or your IP address, from getting out.
Beyond those two factors, it’s difficult to make blanket statements about what makes a trustworthy VPN. At the bare minimum, a good VPN provider should not collect and keep any logs of its customers’ browsing history. If it does, that puts your privacy at risk should someone access (or even release) those logs without authorization. But deciding when to a trust a logging policy isn’t easy. As the EFF points out, “Some VPNs with exemplary privacy policies could be run by devious people.” You don’t need to have done anything illegal to prefer that law enforcement and criminals alike not have access to a browsing history that may include your bank, medical websites, or that one thing you looked at around 2 a.m. that one time.
Yet Mullvad is worth a look because it's extremely private. It asks nothing about you when you sign up. Instead, it assigns you a random number that will be your combined username and password. You don't have to provide an email address, and you can pay by mailing cash to the company's headquarters in Sweden. (Mullvad also takes credit cards, PayPal, bitcoin and wire transfers, and offers 30-day money-back guarantees for those.) Unexpectedly, it was pretty versatile at streaming Netflix from overseas — it didn't always get through, but in no country we tried was it always blocked.
HMA offers servers in the following countries: Brunei, Costa Rica, Ireland, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Bosnia, Lebanon, United Arab Emirates, Israel, Kenya, Cook Islands, Vietnam, Europe, Cayman Islands, Slovakia, Aland Islands, Palestine, Tokelau, Paraguay, Cote d`Ivoire, Morocco, Mexico, Russia, Qatar, Falkland Islands, British Virgin Islands, Belize, Portugal, Ghana, Chile, Turks and Caicos Islands, Thailand, Estonia, Saudi Arabia, Luxembourg, Grenada, Ecuador, Australia, Rwanda, Dominican Republic, Latvia, Vanuatu, Philippines, Saint Helena, Pitcairn Islands, Suriname, Norway, Haiti, Slovenia, Panama, Greenland, South Korea, Seychelles, Singapore, Finland, Georgia, Uganda, Cuba, Montserrat, Myanmar, Indonesia, Kiribati, Hong Kong, Croatia, Bahrain, Botswana, Poland, France, Bahamas, Niue, Lithuania, Pakistan, Czech Republic, Greece, Switzerland, Denmark, Guatemala, Turkey, Bolivia, Macedonia, Brasil, Saint Lucia, Taiwan, Bermuda, Jordan, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Canada, Honduras, Trinidad and Tobago, Spain, Uruguay, Anguilla, Germany, Iraq, United Kingdom, Burkina Faso, Cyprus, Guinea, Afghanistan, Dominica, Nicaragua, Malta, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Bulgaria, Christmas Island, Japan, India, Antigua and Barbuda, Norfolk Island, Iceland, Moldova, Faroe Islands, Yemen, Ukraine, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Barbados, Cameroon, , New Caledonia, Netherlands, Benin, Serbia, North America, Syria, Kuwait, Namibia, El Salvador, Palau, Gabon, Colombia, Montenegro, Jamaica, Venezuela, New Zealand, Peru, Nigeria, Italy, Oceania, Oman, Albania, Argentina, United States, Belgium, Romania, China, Aruba, Sweden, Hungary, Austria, Belarus, Guyana, Macau

If you listen to mainstream media, the only reason for a Virtual Private Network is to erase your online browsing habits and conceal illicit or immoral activity. There is a systematic campaign afoot, designed to blacken the concept of the VPN and ensure that nobody except criminals and perverts would even think of using it. Choosing a name like “Hide My Ass” doesn’t really give the image of a “white hat” service, either. But a VPN is like a gun – it’s not what it is, it’s how it’s used that makes the difference.
The actual location of a VPN company also matters, as it can inform what protections are afforded to customers. Hide My Ass has its company headquarters in London, and operates under the legal jurisdiction of England and Wales. Notably, the UK at large does have mandatory data retention laws. That's not ideal. Many other VPN services operate in countries without mandatory data retention laws, or in ones that have favorable privacy protections for consumers.
At its simplest level, a Virtual Private Network is connection between your computer and a remote data server (or remote network). All data transferred between your computer and the server is encrypted (encoded) using extremely advanced encryption algorithms to make sure nobody who intercepts your data can read it or see what you're doing online (your ISP is an example).
If you’re not looking to take advantage of its Channel Bonding functionality, users still benefit from a few tools designed to ensure users have a stable connection at all times. This includes its error correction algorithm that reduces packet loss and its automated, seamless network switching that acts as a failsafe should users step out of WiFi range or their primary connection fails.

Private Internet Access, or PIA, is one of the most visible, privacy-focused VPNs available. Because of its reputation and advocacy concerning online privacy and security, it has also been a Wirecutter staff pick. But whether you prioritize speed and performance or trust and transparency, our top pick is a better bet. If you find PIA attractive because of its low price, note that spending just a little more on TorGuard will buy you much better performance.
Unless you use a VPN when you torrent, your IP address is exposed to your Internet Service Provider and to every other user taking part in the data transfer. It’s not easy to find the right VPN for torrenting as you need one that offers blazing fast uploads along with robust privacy features and preferably P2P-optimized servers. We make the process as painless as possible with our extensive, impartial VPN reviews – we do the work so you don’t have to.

Large sites and platforms that trade in personal information, such as Google, track clicks, search terms, and other behavior associated with each particular IP address, even if you aren’t logged in to an account on those sites. Facebook collects, sells, and shares information, too, and that info can be used for purposes beyond marketing. By changing your IP address with a VPN, and mingling your activity with that of potentially dozens or hundreds of other people using the same VPN server, you make it harder for those sites to build a marketing profile based on your personal online behavior. Of course, if you’re signed in to your assorted online services, you’re out of luck regardless of VPNs or browser extensions. If you’re curious about how well major companies protect your data privacy from broad government data requests, check out the EFF’s annual “Who Has Your Back?” report.


This is another VPN that features a built-in killswitch, so even if leaks were detected, your torrenting security would still be protected. The problem with leaks is that they often go undetected. So an oblivious user would carry on, thinking that they were safe and secure, all the while their ISP is watching every move they make. A killswitch counteracts this vulnerability.
With hide.me VPN, you become anonymous & safe on the internet reclaiming your online freedom for free. This app allows you to avoid all kind of surveillance from government agencies, ISPs, and cybercriminals. By encrypting your connection hide.me VPN protects your online identity. But that's not it; you can also use it to unblock any website or app which is blocked in your country.
Using a VPN is a little trickier for ChromeOS users, however. While Google has worked to make it easier to use a VPN with a Chromebook or Chromebox, it's not always a walk in the park. Our guide to how to set up a VPN on a Chromebook can make the task a bit easier, however. In these cases, you might find it easier to install a VPN plug-in for the Chrome browser. This will only secure some of your traffic, but it's better than nothing.
Price: proXPN has a free plan, which limits your transfer speeds to 300kpbs and restricts you to one exit location (Miami) in the United States. Premium accounts unlock support for PPTP (if you want to connect a mobile device or a router,) remove the transfer cap, and allows you to choose from any of the company’s other exit locations. Premium plans start at $10/mo, and you can read more about their pricing and plans here.
The globetrotter. This person wants to watch the Olympics live as they happen, without dealing with their crummy local networks. They want to check out their favorite TV shows as they air instead of waiting for translations or re-broadcasts (or watch the versions aired in other countries,) listen to location-restricted streaming internet radio, or want to use a new web service or application that looks great but for some reason is limited to a specific country or region.
Borders still exist on the web, in the form of geographic restrictions for streaming content. The BBC iPlayer, for example, lets UK residents watch the Beeb to their heart's content. The rest of the world, not so much. But if you were to select a VPN server in the UK, your computer's IP address would appear to be the same as the server, allowing you to view the content.
Unlike most other VPN services, Hide.me has a full-fledged free tier. For the low, low price of nothing (not even your credit card information!) you can access three Hide.me VPN server locations on one device at a time. You're also limited to 2GB of data per month and are promised "best effort" speeds that Hide.me says will not go lower than 3 Mbps. Disappointingly, the free version is also limited to PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, and IPSEC (IKEv1 and 2) VPN protocols. While IPSEC IKEv2 is acceptable, it's annoying and a bit odd that Hide.me chooses to limit the better, newer, and faster OpenVPN to its paid users. The other limitations I can understand, but withholding better security technology from some users is a bit offputting.
If you’re unsure about whether you should get a VPN, check out our post that explains what a VPN is and when one makes sense as a privacy and security tool. But most people leave their privacy and security vulnerable in ways that can be addressed with methods other than signing up for a VPN—methods that are potentially more effective. If you have a drafty house with paper-thin walls and halogen light bulbs, you’d get far more value out of every dollar by sealing up cracks, insulating, and switching to LEDs than you would by putting solar panels on your roof. Similarly, before you rush to sign up for a VPN subscription, you should consider these other ways to up your privacy game.
The other concern with huge troves of data being collected and locked away is how often they tend to be unlocked. Data breaches at huge companies are so common now that the headlines aren’t even shocking anymore. If a database of Internet histories, held by an ISP or sold to a marketing partner, were to be publicly released, there’s a good chance even anonymized data could be tied back to real people. If you were to use a VPN, those logs would show only a single, steady connection from your home to a VPN server, and nothing else.
This is where VPNs — which encrypt data leaving your computer and make it impossible for others to see what you’re downloading — come in handy. To the uninitiated, these virtual private networks assign a virtual IP address to obscure your real location from others, which is important when sharing snippets of files with other users of a torrenting client, especially if what you’re sharing is copyrighted material. (This is of course illegal and we do not condone it!)
Jump up ^ Cisco Systems, Inc. (2004). Internetworking Technologies Handbook. Networking Technology Series (4 ed.). Cisco Press. p. 233. ISBN 9781587051197. Retrieved 2013-02-15. [...] VPNs using dedicated circuits, such as Frame Relay [...] are sometimes called trusted VPNs, because customers trust that the network facilities operated by the service providers will not be compromised.
All that being said, we currently name TorGuard as the fastest VPN service. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests. Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect.

Many people are wondering how to achieve the best VPN speed and overall performance. If you are using a good VPN service, you shouldn’t notice a huge reduction in speed. Of course, the extra work that goes into encrypting your traffic across VPN servers will affect speed, but usually it’s not noticeable for regular browsing – especially when using a nearby server.

When we say that in theory VPNs can’t be intercepted, that’s because VPNs are like any other form of security: if you use them on a device that’s already been compromised by malware such as keyloggers or other security threats then they can’t do their job properly. If you’re on Windows, then good quality, up to date anti-virus software isn’t a luxury. It’s absolutely essential.
I am not sure VPNs really do as advertised. The "modem" provided by your ISP is preset to go to the servers of the ISP. Correct? Usually, the ISP will not give you access to the settings within the "modem". Correct? So, if traffic is still going thru your ISP, are we actually bypassing data caps? And wouldn't this also apply to DNS servers? "Modem" still has to go thru ISP. I understand how the web site being addressed is fooled, but none of this does anything to/for the ISP.

Our mission is to provide anyone who wants it with access to a safe and private internet connection. We are the only VPN service that exerts full control over its entire infrastructure. From network architecture and customer support, to our physical hardware and software development, every part of IPVanish is owned and operated by us at IPVanish. This independent style of operation enables us to maintain an airtight zero-logging policy. No other VPN service can match that level of security when they’re borrowing network components.
In the upload tests, Hide.me was in the with the bulk of the pack, reducing upload speeds by 5.6 percent. IPVanish had the best results for these tests, reducing upload speeds by only 2.9 percent. The international upload tests are all clustered around the same place, and Hide.me's 98.4 percent reduction in upload speeds is quite normal. The best score goes to Private Internet Access, which reduced upload speeds by 97.3 percent.
I tried Froot VPN for about 8 months, hoping that the service would improve. It never did. They are extremely disorganized. I would get slow responses to my ticket from a couple of different people, with no help other than the stock responses. I tried leaving a message on their Facebook page, which got a faster response, but again, no help other than the usual responses. I finally told them that I wanted to close my account and that I wanted my money back. I was told that I had gone beyond their 30 day money back policy. I posted on Facebook saying that their service and support was awful. We went back and forth, the guy said there was no record of my previous complaints that he could find, made disparaging remarks about me and my promise to recommend people avoid Froot VPN. I told him to keep the money, that his response was illustrative of an obviously very big problem, and that I would happily continue to not recommend Froot VPN to anyone.
 PureVPN does not log connection information. We like that they offer a 30-day refund policy.  They got bonus points because, important for some of our readers, PureVPN supports bitcoin payments and  you're going like their blazing fast performance. Also, you can grow with them. If after some time, you need to scale up to business-level plans, the company has offerings for growth. Pricing is middle-of-the-road,at $10.95 per month and $35,88 per year.Finally, we like that PurVPN has both Kodi and a Chromebook solution called out right on their Web page. In addition, PureVPN earns the distinction of being the first VPN service we've seen to fully implement the GDPR.
VPNs also cloak your computer's actual IP address, hiding it behind the IP address of the VPN server you're connected to. IP addresses are distributed based on location, so you can estimate someone's location simply by looking at their IP address. And while IP addresses may change, it's possible to track someone across the internet by watching where the same IP address appears. Using a VPN makes it harder for advertisers (or spies, or hackers) to track you online.

Even with extra protection, unique features about your browser may be enough for other parties to collate data about you. For example, browser fingerprints—based on screen size, browser plugins, fonts, time zones, and more—can identify a single user even without cookies or IP addresses. (Check out the EFF’s Panopticlick test tool to see if your browser’s fingerprint is unique and thus trackable. It probably is.)
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