Torrenting is a common name for a specific protocol used to transfer data and files over the web, but not the actual types of files. Although it gets a lot of bad press overall, it is perfectly okay and legal if you’re transferring files that you have the rights to. Piracy, on the other hand, is completely illegal regardless of the tools that you use to do it.
Some VPNs offer “split tunneling,” which routes all traffic through your VPN except specific services or sites that you allow. For example, you might want to send your Web traffic through your VPN but stream Netflix on your fast, domestic connection. But these types of rules are complicated to implement without also leaking other important information, and we didn’t assess how effective they were in practice.
Something pretty great about Speedify is that you can use it for free without even making an account. The moment you install and open the software, you're immediately being protected behind a VPN and can do anything a user can, like change the server, toggle encryption on and off, set monthly or daily limits, and easily connect to the fastest server.

As part of our research, we also make sure to find out where the company is based and under what legal framework it operates. Some countries don't have data-retention laws, making it easier to keep a promise of "We don't keep any logs." It's also useful to know under what circumstances a VPN company will hand over information to law enforcement and what information it would have to provide if that should happen.
In the latency tests, Hide.me performed well, increasing latency by 171.4 percent (yes, that's a good score for these tests!). TorGuard, however, was the only VPN to actually reduce latency, which it did by 6.7 percent. Hide.me fared less well in the international tests, increasing latency by 425.8 percent. ProtonVPN has the best results in these tests, increasing latency by only 380.8 percent.
And they manage to do all of this without sacrificing performance, offering one of the fastest download speeds (83 Mbps out of 100 Mbps) and the best 24/7 customer support in the industry. The only downside? It’s a little on the pricey side, with monthly plans starting between $6.67 and $12.95/mo. But it’s a small price to pay for excellent performance in almost every category.
At a minimum, your ISP keeps track of every IP address it assigned you, often for six to 18 months. ISPs mostly use these records to respond to specific law enforcement requests, often to catch truly awful criminals. But no protections are in place to guarantee that it’s the only way ISPs use these logs. In 2017, the US Department of Justice unsuccessfully demanded that a Web host hand over more than a million IP addresses, namely that of anyone who accessed a website that helped organize protests during the presidential inauguration. Compliance with that demand would have allowed the DOJ to in turn request identifying information from ISPs on anyone who visited the site—including journalists doing research, bored Twitter users clicking a link, or people against the protests who wanted a hate read. A good VPN would spare the innocent the trouble and the invasion of privacy in such a situation.
That was just a bump in the road for Hide My Ass, which performed well in the upload speed tests. It dropped upload domestic upload speeds by 5.25 percent. IPVanish had the best results here, reducing uploads by 2.9 percent. The international upload tests saw a cluster of similar scores, with Hide My Ass in among the rest. In these tests, it slowed upload speeds by 98.3 percent, while Private Internet Access took the best score, reducing speeds by 97.3 percent.
Most services provide perfectly adequate internet speed when in use, and can even handle streaming HD video. However, 4K video and other data-intensive tasks like gaming over a VPN are another story. Some VPN services, such as NordVPN, have started to roll out specialty servers for high-bandwidth activities. And nearly every service we have tested includes a tool to connect you with the fastest available network. Of course, you can always limit your VPN use to when you're not on a trusted network.
HideMyAss! was created in 2005 in Norfolk, England by Jack Cator.[1][2] At the time, Cator was sixteen years-old.[3] He created HMA! in order to circumvent restrictions his school had on accessing games or music from their network.[3] According to Cator, the first HideMyAss! service was created in just a few hours using open-source code.[3][2] The first product was a free website where users typed in a URL and it delivered the website in the user's browser.[4]
To narrow the hundreds of VPN providers down to a manageable list, we first looked at reviews from dedicated sites like vpnMentor and TorrentFreak, research and recommendations from noncommercial sources such as That One Privacy Site and privacytools.io, and user experiences and tips on various subreddits and technology-focused websites like Lifehacker and Ars Technica. We settled on 32 VPNs that were repeatedly recommended. From there, we dug into the details of how each one handled issues from technology to subscriptions:
When you connect to a VPN, you create a secure, encrypted tunnel between your computer and the VPN remote server. The data is essentially gibberish to anyone who intercepts it. Your ISP, government or hackers won’t know which websites you visit. And conversely, the websites you visit won’t know where you are. Typically, logging in to a VPN is as easy as entering a password and clicking a button on a VPN client or a web browser extension.
If you’re not so keen to download a dedicated free VPN app, why not try the Opera browser? Since mid-2016 it has shipped with its own VPN, enabling users to easily bypass region blocking and keep their online transactions secure. It may not be the fastest VPN — and it’s unsuitable for streaming Netflix or torrenting — but Opera VPN is a very popular free choice. Indeed, we’re expecting other browsers to follow suit quite soon.

Hide.me is a premium non-logging VPN service. Their prices are higher than most (if you want the top plan which allows 5 simultaneous connections) but the think I absolutely love (besides the uncrowded servers) is the fact that every single server location has SOCKS5 proxy access. Any one of these can be used with your favorite torrent client, from any of their 20+ server locations.
In addition, ExpressVPN certainly isn’t a cheap provider but you do get what you pay for. If by any chance you end up unhappy about any segment of their service, just contact the friendly customer support team that is available 24/7. They will first try to help you with any problems that might be affecting their service but if it still doesn’t work out, you can demand a refund under their 30-day money-back guarantee. 
PIA is another great option and offers a 7 day money back guarantee. It keeps no logs, which is a claim that it has proved in court! And although optional, its security can be first rate. Its desktop software supports multiple security options, a VPN kill switch, DNS leak protection, and port forwarding. Up to 5 simultaneous connections are permitted. Its Android client is almost as good, and PIA boasts excellent connection speeds. PIA has servers located in 29 other countries.
Many of the servers in VPNArea’s network are optimized for torrenting and P2P downloads with high-bandwidth data channels. They are also one of the few VPNs that work with Netflix with dedicated streaming servers. It passed all privacy and security tests while also having good speeds and reliability. Overall VPNArea is a good privacy-focused VPN service that is also well suited for torrenting.

The Switzerland-based VPN offers some pretty neat features, such as its proprietary Chameleon security protocol which scrambles OpenVPN packet metadata to make sure it’s safe from deep packet inspection (DPI) and VPN blocking and throttling. But that’s not all folks, the list also includes auto-connect options if the connection drops, a kill switch preventing your sensitive data from becoming exposed in an event of a sudden connection drop, as well as the provider’s own DNS.


With hide.me VPN, you become anonymous & safe on the internet reclaiming your online freedom for free. This app allows you to avoid all kind of surveillance from government agencies, ISPs, and cybercriminals. By encrypting your connection hide.me VPN protects your online identity. But that's not it; you can also use it to unblock any website or app which is blocked in your country.
A key differentiator between VPN services is the number of available servers and their geographic distribution. Lots of servers means you're more likely to find a server that's not bogged down with other users. For its part, Hide My Ass has a very respectable 876 servers at its disposal. That said, NordVPN, Private Internet Access, and TorGuard VPN have well over 3,000 servers apiece. Those are my benchmarks for robustness in the VPN server category.
While some torrent clients offer different encryption setup options, these will not protect you. This is because media companies run networks of monitoring nodes, which are able to join torrent swarms and collect IP addresses and connection data of the infringing parties. If your torrent client connects with one of these nodes and you are not using a VPN, your identity could easily be compromised. This is why a VPN offers the best protection when torrenting, rather than simply relying on your torrent client.
If you are listening to music with one of these streaming apps, you are most likely using a mobile device. When choosing a top VPN like Ipvanish or VPN express, you will want to be sure that your premium VPN service also offers coverage for mobile and if you are a Windows user, make sure you go for a VPN for windows. A mobile VPN will cover you on the go, so you never have to worry about your online privacy, whether you’re on your desktop computer, smartphone, or tablet.

Internet speed and Bandwidth: Torrent is all about downloading. VPN you are selecting for torrent download should have ultra fast internet speed with unlimited usage of bandwidth so that you can download as much as torrent you want without worrying about bandwidth usage. Our best VPN for torrent includes the VPN services with unlimited bandwidth and VPN with fast download speed which will help you to pick the best among all.
Then you find a VPN service that has a setup for your router. Many of them do. Even better, if you have a router that's supported by DD-WRT, flash your router with that and then put the VPN info in your newly flashed router and you can have 60 computers go through your router, all being protected by your VPN. That way you aren't breaking the VPN services rules by trying to use more than the one or two 'allowed' devices to go out through the VPN.
If you’re going to use torrents, however, life is easier if you use a VPN—especially if the network you’re on blocks torrenting. There are many VPNs among our top picks that could be used for downloading torrents, but our preferred choice is Private Internet Access. This no-frills VPN has an absolute ton of servers, good speeds, and a nice amount of country locations to remain relatively anonymous. (Read our full review.) The price is right at less than $40 a year, and its privacy policies have been tested in court. Plus, advanced users can adjust their level of encryption for data encryption, data authentication, and handshake.

When using a VPN network like VPN Master for streaming sports, you will want to make sure that the transfer of data is high speed; only the best VPN services can ensure that. This way, you avoid having a glitchy viewing experience using your VPN. The speed of your VPN shouldn’t drop below 15-20% in order to avoid delays due to buffering. We will help you decide which VPN work best for you in order to watch your favorite sports games.
Torrenting has become a hot topic recently, as major production houses and record labels began to notice a significant drop in their profits. Although the practice has occurred for years, it wasn’t until it affected producer’s income that firms decided to take offense. Today, all over the world, torrenters are facing arrests, fines and legal warning for downloading a few songs, the latest season of a TV show, a movie or two, or even a book. The fuss made by the big media businesses has even encouraged certain governments to tighten laws around P2P file-sharing.
Borders still exist on the web, in the form of geographic restrictions for streaming content. The BBC iPlayer, for example, lets UK residents watch the Beeb to their heart's content. The rest of the world, not so much. But if you were to select a VPN server in the UK, your computer's IP address would appear to be the same as the server, allowing you to view the content.
As shown in the latest speed tests for the VPN.ac review, it offers excellent performance and secure, leak-proof applications. (You can see their real-time bandwidth stats by selecting VPN Nodes Status at the top of the website.) In addition to the VPN, you can also use their secure proxy browser extension, available for Firefox, Chrome, and Opera browsers.
Torrents VPN are useful for helping you protecting your privacy and avoid getting fine for anti-piracy notice called “three strike” from your ISP. If you get caught while torrenting then you will need to pay the copyright holders a huge fine and your Internet Service Provider (ISP) will provide your personal information to law enforcement agency. VPN for torrent does two things – first it changes your IP address and location. So your identity remains anonymous. Secondly, VPN for torrent encrypts your browsing and downloading traffic through secure tunnel (Server) so that your ISP can’t track your online activity. So if you download torrents with secure VPN your ISP will not be able track it let alone sending notice and warning. Thirdly, some ISP cap your Internet speed for Bit-torrent protocol, makes it super slow while downloading torrent files. To avoid bandwidth throttling , you can use Torrents VPN.

If your account is identified by us following a notification that it has been used in breach of our terms of service, we reserve the right to suspend your account to prevent further abuse, however, in such circumstances we will never voluntarily hand over your personal data to a third party unless we are legally compelled to do so in accordance with English law.
Credit: Opera VPNAlso, although your data is encrypted as it travels between you and the far-off VPN server, it won't necessarily be encrypted once it leaves the VPN server to get to its final destination. If the data isn't encrypted — and that depends on the website you're connecting to — then the traffic might be intercepted and read. (One well-known VPN provider was recently accused of inserting ads in users' web browsers, which would violate users' security and privacy.)
There are many, many VPN providers, and Mozilla can’t recommend any specific service. PC World, however, has reviewed a ton of VPN services and ranked them all. The winner? Currently it’s Sweden-based Mullvad, which doesn’t even keep your email address. Instead, it auto-generates an anonymous account number when you create an account. The service is reportedly fast and ultra secure. Speedy services CyberGhost and TunnelBear also ranked highly, and NordVPN was called out as a great way to watch blocked U.S. Netflix shows and other services while abroad. FoxyProxy, by Mozillian Eric Jung, offers VPN service in more than 68 countries.

Pricing is quite flexible, with a three-day plan available for just $2. But for those who want to avail of the complete service and support, A basic plan of $5 per month, a solid plan of $10 a month, and dedicated plan of $25 per month are also available. These packages offer users access to Proxy.sh servers in different countries and unlimited bandwidth. Custom plans can be arranged, all one has to do is contact support.

Note: Unless otherwise noted, most of the discussion here addresses ISPs and law enforcement in the United States; situations are different in other countries. For instance, the European Union has specific rules on collecting and protecting customer data but also has a complicated history with laws requiring certain data be collected for law enforcement.
Disclaimer: Top10VPN is not a VPN service and does not endorse the use of VPNs for unlawful means. Users should ensure they adhere to all applicable laws and terms of service when using a VPN. We have no control over third-party websites and your use of them may be governed by their terms and conditions. We are an advertising-supported comparison and review site and may be compensated for featuring certain providers. We strive to keep the information on our Website up-to-date and accurate, but we do not guarantee that this will always be the case.

Yes. Although Netflix is now available almost everywhere, some places – notably the United States – enjoy a much larger catalog of titles than everywhere else. And some people want to access regional catalogs. In theory, all you need do to watch a local version of Netflix from somewhere else is connect to a VPN server in that country. You can sign into any regional Netflix page with any active Netflix account, no matter where that account is registered. The snag is that due to pressure from its content producers, Netflix now tries to ban IP addresses that it knows belongs to VPN and proxy services. Many VPN services have found sneaky ways around this ban, but it is a cat and mouse game.  Please see our best Netflix VPNs for a list of services which still work with Netflix (most of the time).
TunnelBear has some strong supporters among Wirecutter’s staff. The company has a public history of transparency, staff listings, and the clearest privacy policy of any VPN service we’ve found, plus TunnelBear is one of the only VPNs to release a public audit of its system. But the service was one of the least reliable we tried. In four of our 18 connection tests, we managed broadband speeds; in a handful of others TunnelBear was well below the average, and in even more it failed to provide a usable connection at all. As we were writing this guide, security giant McAfee announced that it had acquired TunnelBear. Fans of the service should keep an eye out for changes to its privacy stance and transparency as the US-based firm takes over.
The actual location of a VPN company also matters, as it can inform what protections are afforded to customers. Hide My Ass has its company headquarters in London, and operates under the legal jurisdiction of England and Wales. Notably, the UK at large does have mandatory data retention laws. That's not ideal. Many other VPN services operate in countries without mandatory data retention laws, or in ones that have favorable privacy protections for consumers.
PrivateVPN is a zero-logs Swedish provider. It features a firewall-based system Kill Switch and application-level kill switch, which is great. Full IPv4 and IPv6 DNS leak protection is also built-in to its client. We have been particularly impressed by PrivateVPN’s high level of customer service, which even features remote installation for technophobes! A cracking 6 simultaneous devices, port forwarding, HTTPS and SOCKS5 proxies all make PrivateVPN a very enticing option for those that want to get the most out of their VPN.
First and foremost, using a VPN prevents anyone on the same network access point (or anywhere else) from intercepting your web traffic in a man-in-the-middle attack. This is especially handy for travelers and for those using public Wi-Fi networks, such as web surfers at hotels, airports, and coffee shops. Someone on the same network, or the person in control of the network you're using, could conceivably intercept your information while you're connected.
Hide.me is a no-logs VPN based in Malaysia. It is rather expensive for what you get, so I had hoped to find a VPN that justified the cost. And in many ways Hide.me is indeed, good. It uses extremely strong encryption, is quite fully-featured, and has a great regard for privacy. I detected an IP leak, however, and speed performance is very unexciting.
If you're alive this far into the 21st century, you're probably streaming video and music on a daily basis. Unfortunately, just because you paid for that privilege in one country doesn't mean you can access it in another. Many streaming companies, and especially Netflix, block VPN users in order to prevent them from accessing content that's not meant to be streamed in their country.
In the most recent round of testing, we've also looked at how many virtual servers a given VPN company uses. A virtual server is just what it sounds like—a software-defined server running on server hardware that might have several virtual servers onboard. The thing about virtual servers is that they can be configured to appear as if they are in one country when they are actually being hosted somewhere else. That's an issue if you're especially concerned about where you web traffic is traveling. It's a bit worrisome to choose one location and discover you're actually connected somewhere else entirely.

In addition to blocking malicious sites and ads, some VPNs also claim to block malware. We don't test the efficacy of these network-based protections, but most appear to be blacklists of sites known to host malicious software. That's great, but don't assume it's anywhere near as good as standalone antivirus. Use this feature to complement, not replace, your antivirus.
Perfect Privacy’s network is composed entirely of dedicated, bare-metal servers that provide you with fast speeds, high security, and plenty of bandwidth at all times (you can see real-time server bandwidth here). Like ExpressVPN, Perfect Privacy has also passed real-world tests that verified their no logging claims, when one their server was seized in Rotterdam (customer data remained safe).
Trusting a VPN is a hard choice, but IVPN's transparency goes a long way toward proving that its customers' privacy is a priority. Founder and CEO Nick Pestell answered all of our questions about the company's internal security, and even described the tools the company uses to limit and track access to secure servers. IVPN goes further than the other leading candidates we considered by being transparent about who runs the service and who is responsible for your privacy.

After testing many providers, we came out with a short list of the best VPN for torrenting. And keep in mind that, even though these providers are useful for other purposes, these reviews are only focused on the use of VPNs for file-sharing. The providers we chose have one thing in common, they all allow BitTorrent traffic and they provide a good level of security that will make you anonymous.

Hide.me does not seek to monetize its own users by injecting advertising into their data. That's great. Furthermore, the company does not monitor what sites you access, log your true IP address, or even timestamp your connection. It does keep some troubleshooting information, including "customer's randomly generated username and internally assigned (non-public) IP address," but it deletes that information every few hours. The company does track the amount of traffic for users, since two of Hide.me's plans have data caps. That's reasonable, and Hide.me deserves credit for its efforts to build privacy into their systems.
Many sites will tell you that the chances of facing legal action as a result of pirating copyrighted material are slim. That’s bad advice. While it’s true that copyright holders have bigger fish to fry than the guy that just wants to watch Age of Ultron a few weeks before it comes out on Blu-Ray, you’d be surprised how many people face at least the threat of legal action.
One of the major reasons why people recommend VPN over proxies is that torrent clients reveal your true location and leak information while using proxy. Although, the latest version of torrent clients are designed to do a better job at this but I personally don’t trust proxy services. They can be unreliable and fail to protect you while using torrents. I would rather stick with a VPN just because of this. Currently, I am using PIA (Private Internet Access) but I have also heard good reviews about PureVPN.

The service uses Advanced Encryption Standard with a 256-bit key, a common method employed by VPN services. Connections are protected using 2048-bit public key encryption. For privacy, the service offers a malware detection software. What is good about the software is that it can be downloaded and used without providing any personal information. This holds as long as you use the free version of the software and never contact customer support.
Which means you’re wide open to all sorts of advertiser schemes. They could even charge you more for your favourite subscription services once they know how much you love it! As well as this there’s the access to your private messages, adult content viewings and entire browsing history — all open to tracking, storing and selling by your ISP when you don’t have a VPN service.
Although there are a number of Torrent VPN provider in the industry, however not all of them are capable of offering good speeds, server coverage and security that would benefit torrent users. With that said, being aware of the needs of P2P user, I have covered a complete list of top VPNs along with all sorts of benefits and issues associated with torrenting.
Torrenting enables very fast download speeds for large files by connecting with several other users. An obvious downside of torrenting, then, is the privacy and security concerns that come with the territory of connecting to several other Internet users at once, allowing all of them to share pieces of files and see your IP address. This makes it imperative to choose a VPN with great security features for the user looking to download torrented files.
Increasingly, mobile professionals who need reliable connections are adopting mobile VPNs.[33][need quotation to verify] They are used for roaming seamlessly across networks and in and out of wireless coverage areas without losing application sessions or dropping the secure VPN session. A conventional VPN can not withstand such events because the network tunnel is disrupted, causing applications to disconnect, time out,[31] or fail, or even cause the computing device itself to crash.[33]
VPNs can make your browsing private, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re anonymous. VPN services can and do log traffic (even the ones that say they don’t log do need to log some information, or they wouldn’t be able to function properly), and those logs can be requested by the authorities. Think of a VPN as being like curtains: people can’t peek through your curtains if you’ve got them closed, but curtains won’t hide your house.
Although the extent of the collection is unclear, you can be certain that your ISP will collect data on you, and that it will use that data to sell you things or to help advertising partners sell you things. (In 2017, Congress voted down proposed rules that would prevent ISPs from collecting or selling many types of information about customer activities.) For example, if your ISP is AT&T, it could collect data about your search for home security systems and aggressively promote its own offering to you. Or Comcast could use your online behavior to figure out how to get you to watch more Hulu, which Comcast co-owns, instead of competitors like Netflix. A VPN would prevent an ISP from easily collecting this type of data about you.
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