Trust and transparency issues are the foremost concerns in choosing a great VPN, and if a service doesn’t have enough locations to be useful to you, all the security features won’t make a difference. But after those concerns have been satisfied, we recommend that most people use connections based on the OpenVPN protocol, because of security flaws and disadvantages in the PPTP and L2TP/IPsec protocols. (Experienced users may consider IKEv2, but because it has its own debated pros and cons, we ruled it out.) Though AES 128-bit encryption is fine for most purposes, we prefer services that default to the more-secure 256-bit encryption and still offer good performance.
In the domestic latency tests, Hide My Ass had an impressively small impact, increasing ping time by only 42.9 percent. TorGuard VPN had the best score in this category, actually reducing latency by a slight 6.7 percent. Results were less rosy in the international latency tests, where Hide My Ass increased latency by 400.3 percent. TunnelBear had the best score in this round, increasing latency by 270.3 percent.
“For an affordable and reliable VPN service, you can definitely rely on hide.me. Only the best security protocols and software was used to develop this fantastic VPN to provide you with the ultimate security while you can still enjoy high speed network functionality. hide.me is available for the most popular platforms and is one of the few VPNs that allow you to connect on up to different devices at a greatly affordable rate which is a superb solution for companies or online gamers.” May 29, 2018 Bestvpnrating.com

ExpressVPN attempts to build trust in other ways, even without a public face. Court records from 2017 demonstrate that when Turkish authorities seized ExpressVPN servers in the country looking for information, they found nothing of value, as promised by ExpressVPN’s no-logging policy. ExpressVPN also highlights initiatives such as open-source leak-testing tools, developer content about how the company implements different technologies, and support for the efforts of OpenMedia and the EFF. The ExpressVPN representative even offered to arrange a confidential call between our writer and the owners of the company. However, without being able to discuss their identities or learn about other senior leadership, we believed that wouldn’t have been enough to change our recommendation, so we declined. In the end, trust is such a crucial part of deciding which VPN to use that we had to pass on ExpressVPN.


VPNGate is a fantastic academic initiative out of Japan that aims to uncensor the web for people living under oppressive anti-free speech regimes. It uses a network of volunteer nodes around the world as relays. It discourages P2P filesharing activities that would hog the network, however, and it keeps logs for up to three months to help weed out abuse and criminal wrongdoing.
Consider a public Wi-Fi network, perhaps at a coffee shop or airport. Usually, you would connect without a second thought, but do you know who might be keeping tabs on the network traffic? Can you even be confident the hotspot is legitimate, or might it be operated by a criminal who's hunting for your personal data? Think about the passwords, banking details, credit card numbers, and just any private information that you send every time you go online.
IVPN also performed well in our speed tests. Though it wasn't always the fastest in the 54 measurements we took on each service, it ranked near the top on many servers at different times of the week—especially compared with the most trustworthy services. Private Internet Access, one of the most visible, privacy-focused VPNs, had slower speeds when connecting to most servers and less reliable connections than IVPN. For US servers (which we expected to be the fastest locations because we tested from California), IVPN ranked behind only OVPN and TorGuard. We liked OVPN—especially its speed results—but we thought that company's small team and small selection of servers and locations were too limiting for some people.
Unlike most other VPN services, Hide.me has a full-fledged free tier. For the low, low price of nothing (not even your credit card information!) you can access three Hide.me VPN server locations on one device at a time. You're also limited to 2GB of data per month and are promised "best effort" speeds that Hide.me says will not go lower than 3 Mbps. Disappointingly, the free version is also limited to PPTP, L2TP, SSTP, and IPSEC (IKEv1 and 2) VPN protocols. While IPSEC IKEv2 is acceptable, it's annoying and a bit odd that Hide.me chooses to limit the better, newer, and faster OpenVPN to its paid users. The other limitations I can understand, but withholding better security technology from some users is a bit offputting.
The big refresh of the App after recent improvements to our VPN service means it's now better than ever! The iOS app is now faster and connections are even more reliable (thanks to the new IKEv2 protocol). The App itself now looks the same as our Desktop version i.e. fantastic. Plus, there are new localisations meaning the app can speak your language. Feeling very proud of all my herds hard work!

In the latency tests, Hide.me performed well, increasing latency by 171.4 percent (yes, that's a good score for these tests!). TorGuard, however, was the only VPN to actually reduce latency, which it did by 6.7 percent. Hide.me fared less well in the international tests, increasing latency by 425.8 percent. ProtonVPN has the best results in these tests, increasing latency by only 380.8 percent.


If you're alive this far into the 21st century, you're probably streaming video and music on a daily basis. Unfortunately, just because you paid for that privilege in one country doesn't mean you can access it in another. Many streaming companies, and especially Netflix, block VPN users in order to prevent them from accessing content that's not meant to be streamed in their country.
A proxy server is another way to conceal your real location. By transferring data through a proxy server the data appears to be going to that server, not you - so for example if you’re in the US and the proxy is in Switzerland, the website or service will think it’s talking to a machine in Switzerland. The main difference is that VPNs protect all your traffic while proxies tend to be limited to specific types of data, such as peer to peer networking or web browsing. 

One of the most important factors when you’re choosing a VPN provider is also the hardest to quantify: trust. All your Internet activity will flow through this company’s servers, so you have to trust that company more than the network you’re trying to secure, be it a local coffee shop’s Wi-Fi, your campus Internet connection, your corporate IT network, or your home ISP. In all our research, we came across a lot of gray areas when it came to trusting a VPN, and only two hard rules: Know who you’re trusting, and remember that security isn’t free.

Better yet, a year's worth of PIA is very reasonably priced at US$3.31 a month, and we've had nothing but excellent customer service from them, too. PIA also comes with a rock solid no-log policy, crypto payment support to keep you protected when making transactions, proprietary anti-malware technology and a seven-day money-back guarantee if you get cold feet.
Torrenting has also become one of the main forms of sharing files online. If you are looking for a quick VPN download for this purpose, then you have come to the right place. Torrenting itself is not inherently illegal, but it is important to check for the copyright holder’s consent before you use your VPN windows to download. In order to torrent without sharing your IP address, you can use one of the top VPNs like IPvanish for secure torrenting. You no longer have to lose sleep worrying that the government is snooping on your torrenting activity. It’s not at all difficult to look for a VPN for windows; just take a look at our pick of the best VPN for torrenting. You can find VPNs for the Ukraine, USA, UK, or almost any other country. 
Connecting to a VPN is fairly simple. In Windows, press the Windows key, type VPN, and click the Set up a virtual private network (VPN) connection option. (If you use Windows 8, you’ll have to click the Settings category after searching.) Use the wizard to enter the address and login credentials of the VPN service you want to use. You can then connect to and disconnect from VPNs using the network icon in the system tray – the same one where you manage the Wi-Fi networks you’re connected to.

Moreover, by selecting your specific location or country it’s possible to continue watching subscription services that you have already paid for, including any other local content you may be interested in. Likewise, those who don’t stay in America can essentially choose to be in the country virtually, so as to access blocked websites from outside the nation.


Control channel: an AES-256-GCM cipher with RSA-8192 handshake encryption. Additional authentication is not required with GCM, but HMAC SHA384 hash authentication is also specified in the encryption suite. Perfect Forward Secrecy is " is enabled by default." I will assume this means a standard Diffie-Hellman Exchange (DHE) is used, but it may be higher.

I am not sure VPNs really do as advertised. The "modem" provided by your ISP is preset to go to the servers of the ISP. Correct? Usually, the ISP will not give you access to the settings within the "modem". Correct? So, if traffic is still going thru your ISP, are we actually bypassing data caps? And wouldn't this also apply to DNS servers? "Modem" still has to go thru ISP. I understand how the web site being addressed is fooled, but none of this does anything to/for the ISP.

We handpick servers that live up to our high standards of security and privacy. They're access controlled, and we are the only ones that operate them — no one else. They do not store IP addresses, nor do they store logs. Each server supports all popular protocols, including: PPTP, L2TP, IPsec (IKEv1 and IKEv2), OpenVPN, SoftEther, SSTP and SOCKS. With the very best server locations and low ping times, the internet is yours for the taking — wherever you might be.
Depending on how ISPs respond to a newly deregulated environment, a VPN could tunnel traffic past any choke points or blockades thrown up by ISPs. That said, an obvious response would be to block or throttle all VPN traffic. Or perhaps ISPs will come up with an entirely novel way to monetize the letitude given them by the current lack of net neutrality legislation.
Nope, you’ll need a VPN for that. While a proxy can allow you to appear as if you’re located elsewhere, it only allows you to choose from a small number of servers. In order to stream global content from your paid subscription services you’ll need to be connected to specific VPN streaming servers. Have a read of our streaming guide to find out more about how you can do this.
Right now, their cheapest plan is an annual subscription that comes out to around $8/month. This puts it firmly on the high end of VPN prices. In exchange, the user gets custom clients for different operating systems and great configuration guides for mobile devices. This places Buffered as more of a niche product for customers who want to get a lot of mileage out of deeper VPN features, but would like to do so with the aid of tutorial videos and documentation.
The main drawback is that VPN.ac maintains connection logs for network security, which they clearly explain on their website. These logs do not include any browsing or activity, but instead, basic connection data and everything is erased daily. All support inquiries are handled internally by the network security professionals who run the service (no third-party support). [Learn more >]
In 2015, a review in Tom's Hardware said HideMyAss! was easy to use, had good customer service, and a large number of server locations to choose from, but criticized it for slowing internet speeds.[19] In contrast, Digital Trends said HideMyAss! had strong speeds and good server selection, but wasn't full-proof at ensuring anonymity, because it stored user activity logs.[10] In 2017, PC World noted that it was difficult to measure the effect a VPN service has on internet speed, because of variables like location, internet service speeds, and hardware.[20]
I subscribed to their services on June 2016 for one year @ $1.83 PM. For six months everything worked well, so I extended their service for 2 more years. Then the problems started, the nearest servers would fail and I had to always rely on distant servers with a very high ping and low speeds. Their P2P services have become terrible ! Their customer service is pathetic ! They tell you to do this and that and probably never understand what our problem is.
A VPN masks your IP address so that other devices in the swarm only see the IP address of the P2P VPN server. The best VPNs for torrenting typically use shared IP addresses, meaning dozens and even hundreds of users are assigned the same IP address. This large pool of users makes it next to impossible to trace torrenting activity back to a single person. Furthermore, if you use one of the logless VPNs on this list, the VPN provider won’t have any user information to hand over when hit with a DMCA notice or settlement letter.

IPVanish wasn't the top performer in our 2017 round of testing, falling in about the middle of the pack. But it was one of the most reliable VPN services, connecting smoothly and staying connected every time we used it. IPVanish has excellent client software, although you can connect to the company's servers manually, and a decent array of about 850 connection points in 50 countries. However, its subscription price is kind of high, and its U.S. base may be a negative for some potential customers.
While it is true that companies like Google and Facebook make money off your behavior, you are not necessarily forced to use those services. If you suddenly decided to stop using Facebook, you might miss out on cute pet pics and political rants from your friends and family, but you could still live a decent, perhaps better, life. You could even choose to avoid the Google-o-sphere entirely by using the privacy conscious DuckDuckGo for your web searches, and drop the Google-backed Chrome for the nonprofit Firefox.
The other concern with huge troves of data being collected and locked away is how often they tend to be unlocked. Data breaches at huge companies are so common now that the headlines aren’t even shocking anymore. If a database of Internet histories, held by an ISP or sold to a marketing partner, were to be publicly released, there’s a good chance even anonymized data could be tied back to real people. If you were to use a VPN, those logs would show only a single, steady connection from your home to a VPN server, and nothing else.
For mobile devices, the situation is a little thornier. Most companies offer VPN apps for Android and iOS, which is great because we use these devices to connect to Wi-Fi all the time. However, VPNs don't always play nice with cellular connections. That said, it takes some serious effort to intercept cellphone data, although law enforcement or intelligence agencies may have an easier time gaining access to this data, or metadata, through connections with mobile carriers or by using specialized equipment.
TorGuard’s signup and payment process is also fine but not stellar. Compared with that of IVPN, the checkout process is clunky, and using a credit or debit card requires entering more personal information than with our top pick. The easiest option for anonymous payments is a prepaid debit card bought locally. Otherwise, like most providers, TorGuard accepts a variety of cryptocurrencies, PayPal, and foreign payments through Paymentwall. That last service also allows you to submit payment through gift cards from other major retailers. We don’t think this method is worth the hassle for most people, but if you have some money on a fast-food gift card you don’t want, turning it into a VPN service is a nice option.
As VPN services allow you to access online content as though you were physically located in a different country, they’re extremely useful if you’re travelling on business and need to access location-restricted services or if you need to see how and whether a particular website or service works properly for users elsewhere in the world. With servers in over 190 countries, Hide My Ass! is by far the best equipped VPN provider in this respect, on the off-chance that you ever need to see what your website looks like to users in Burkina Faso.
What is a VPN? VPN or Virtual Private Network is a secure private network that helps you keep your online identity invisible by replacing your original IP with one of its own. When you connect to a VPN, it encrypts all your traffic and passed it through a secure tunnel created by a military-graded protocol. With VPN all your communication is secure from hackers and any third party intruders. Why hide.me VPN? hide.me VPN is the world’s fastest VPN that offers unmatched privacy with highly advanced security features. You can subscribe to hide.me’s Free VPN that works equally amazing on Windows 10. We offer the easiest Free VPN solution which doesn’t require any Signup or Registration. Just install and start using it. Free Trial Features for Windows 10 -No Subscription or Credit Card Information required -3 Locations including (Singapore, Netherlands and Canada) -Auto-connect server option -Auto-Reconnect option -VPN App is supported in 15 different languages Free accounts offer 500MB limit for 2 weeks, which can be renewed infinite times. Plus & Premium Features for Windows 10 All features of FREE Plan as well as some additional features including -Unlimited Bandwidth -Unlimited data transfer limit for Premium plan -5 simultaneous logins in Premium plan -45 different VPN locations What Can I Do Using hide.me VPN You can do a lot many things using hide.me VPN including -Protect your device at public WiFi -Secure your online identity -Protect all your online activities
In the most recent round of testing, we've also looked at how many virtual servers a given VPN company uses. A virtual server is just what it sounds like—a software-defined server running on server hardware that might have several virtual servers onboard. The thing about virtual servers is that they can be configured to appear as if they are in one country when they are actually being hosted somewhere else. That's an issue if you're especially concerned about where you web traffic is traveling. It's a bit worrisome to choose one location and discover you're actually connected somewhere else entirely.
PIA also has other features similar to other providers. It supports all VPN protocols, DD-WRT routers and 5 simultaneous connections. They accept a variety of payment methods and it’s affordable. The speeds are by no means the fastest. We experienced some slowdown but that’s not enough to affect torrenting and streaming. PIA is by far great but the only flaw is the limited number of countries, only 17. Nevertheless, it is still a good VPN for torrenting.

CyberGhost offers real big bang for your buck. While it has a very low price point, the list of features are up there with the best of them. No bandwidth limits (which is a must for torrenters), 5 simultaneous connections, strong encryption and a watertight logging policy all add up to a robust VPN package. CyberGhost has a global coverage with decent local (burst) speeds. The team is a major supporter and promoter of civil rights, a free society and an uncensored internet culture. Our kind of folks!
There's a reason why all these VPNs are paid. Providing encryption and VPN services to millions of users is a resource-intensive work that requires servers across the world. A free VPN might be enough for something minor like checking foreign news occasionally. If you need a VPN on a regular basis, however, you’re better off with a reliable paid service.
ExpressVPN   has 148 locations in 94 different countries which means you can dial your IP address into 148 locations around the world. ExpressVPN delivers great performance - and it’s put the effort into its software too, with dedicated apps for Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android and BlackBerry as well as some Smart TVs, Amazon Fire TV Sticks, Apple TV, PS4 and Xbox and even your router. Not only that but there are solid online tutorials too, so even if VPNs are dark magic to you they’ll have you up and running in no time. P2P is fully supported and it's super speedy so you can torrent using the maximum bandwidth of your broadband connection and there’s a kill switch that keeps your IP address hidden if anything goes wrong with the VPN or with your internet connection. ExpressVPN is reasonably priced, delivers a good service and has support for three simultaneous connections. There’s no free trial available but there is a no-fuss 30-day money back guarantee if the service doesn’t meet your requirements so that's a good way to test it out if you're unsure. We have used the 24/7 customer service a number of times and can vouch for its effectiveness - we had a couple of issues with using the service on a PC and were able to sort it within a few minutes using the instant online chat support.
VPN (or virtual private network) services create a secure, encrypted connection between your computer and a VPN server at another location. That type of secure connection is a worthwhile investment for anyone who wants to wrap their data in an extra layer of privacy and security, especially when connecting to public Wi-Fi networks. But a VPN is not a magic bullet for Internet security and won’t make you anonymous online.
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