HideMyAss! was created in 2005 in Norfolk, England by Jack Cator.[1][2] At the time, Cator was sixteen years-old.[3] He created HMA! in order to circumvent restrictions his school had on accessing games or music from their network.[3] According to Cator, the first HideMyAss! service was created in just a few hours using open-source code.[3][2] The first product was a free website where users typed in a URL and it delivered the website in the user's browser.[4]
When choosing your VPN, do your research and mind the legal aspects. Countries like Germany, France or Japan are cracking down on copyright infringement, while the members of the 14 Eyes treaty have draconian data retention laws and extensive surveillance. So, if you’re looking to maximize your privacy, you might want to avoid connecting to servers in those countries.
I subscribed to their services on June 2016 for one year @ $1.83 PM. For six months everything worked well, so I extended their service for 2 more years. Then the problems started, the nearest servers would fail and I had to always rely on distant servers with a very high ping and low speeds. Their P2P services have become terrible ! Their customer service is pathetic ! They tell you to do this and that and probably never understand what our problem is.
Active attacks: Placing code or hardware on VPN servers in order to compromise traffic is the most resource-intensive method of attack. “[The] ability to attack VPNs and underlying protocols varies across governments, and even within agencies that are part of the same government. For instance, NSA is far more capable than the DEA or the local police.”
As for the geographic diversity of Hide.me's servers, the company has done a fairly good job covering the Earth. Many VPN companies ignore South America, India, and all of Africa, but Hide.me has a few locations in these regions. It also have servers in China and Turkey, regions known to censor the web. Hide.me does not offer any servers in Russia, but NordVPN (and others) do.

VPN performance is affected by such a wide range of factors that it’s not possible to produce conclusive test results. The speed of your own internet connection and user load on your selected VPN endpoint server, as well as the server you’re connecting to beyond that all make a difference. Due to the sheer number of frequently-rotated servers provided by most VPN services, comprehensive testing isn’t possible.
We contacted each of our finalists with simple questions about its service and troubleshooting. Most VPN companies provide technical support through online ticketing systems, meaning you’ll need to wait for a response. This means that self-help support sites are even more important, since waiting for a reply while your connection is down can be frustrating. Response times to our support inquiries ranged from 20 minutes to a day.
While I appreciate the emphasis on real-world applications for VPNs, I think it's better to just have a button to quickly get a person online safely. Most people might not be familiar with the benefits of using a VPN, or understand what the distinction is among the three modes. (Truth be told, I'm not sure I do, either.) A big, simple button similar to NordVPN or TunnelBear, with other options under the hood, seems like the best approach. Still, it's far friendlier and easier to use than, say, Private Internet Access, which is little more than a window to start your connection.
We used to advise people to do banking and other important business over their cellular connection when using a mobile device, since it is generally safer than connecting with a public Wi-Fi network. But even that isn't always a safe bet. Researchers have demonstrated how a portable cell tower, such as a femtocell, can be used for malicious ends. The attack hinges on jamming the LTE and 3G bands, which are secured with strong encryption, and forcing devices to connect with a phony tower over the less-secure 2G band. Because the attacker controls the fake tower, he can carry out a man-in-the-middle attack and see all the data passing over the cellular connection. Admittedly, this is an exotic attack, but it's far from impossible.
A VPN (Virtual Private Network) is like having a PO box on the Internet – an address that is not publicly available. Instead of giving out its personal IP address when you click on a website, your iPhone or iPad gives one of ours. The result? You are securely connected wherever our VPN server is located! Plus, your communications are secured and encrypted, even when using untrusted public networks.
Local download speeds typically topped a 178Mbps (peaking at an incredible 334Mbps in Paris) with local uploads almost as fast. While not as fast as our top picks, this is perfectly adequate for torrenting. A strict zero logs policy and first-party DNS servers mean no data even exists to identify you, while privacy features like the kill switch are ideal for torrenting.

TorGuard was consistently one of the fastest services we tested. When we averaged three tests performed at different times of the week with Internet Health Test, TorGuard was the fastest service when connecting in the UK and Asia, the second fastest in the US, and the third fastest in Central Europe. OVPN was the next most consistent, but that company’s small network doesn’t have any servers in Asia, and it ranked fifth in the UK. Our top pick, IVPN, was the third most consistently fast after TorGuard and OVPN. However, we tested with each app’s default settings—since we expect most people won’t change them—and TorGuard’s default 128-bit encryption gives it an advantage in speed tests over VPNs that default to 256-bit encryption, as most services do. Still, we think 128-bit encryption is fine for most people who prioritize speed, and TorGuard’s consistency makes it a good value as our budget pick.
Thank you for compling this list. awesome site, and great informative topic, one of which is always top of mind for me. I learned a good deal from the article and the kind folks who shared their uses. I was (and have been in other - though not as thorough, and well-written) surprised not to see more about (if anything about AirVPN) - thought as the previous poster as of this writing, notes it. I have been using it for years too. I needed absolute security, and legitimately based. Written by hackers in Spain after a conference, I feel comfortable using their services. Legally, they stand up, and anonymity are valued. They have solid legal backing pretty bullet proof from what I understand. I do feel that this is an excellent service and have never had any issues with it and in fact, feel it is just another excellent layer of steps to protect my right to privacy. Not that I need to hide anything -- well, everyone says that :) - I do feel that these guys know what they are doing. Service is excellent, and I certainly don't mind paying for it - great service. I like that I can - go anywhere in the world and pick and choose various servers. They don't keep log files, and what they do and how they do it is legit. They also have been recognized as the previous poster state been around for a few years indeed, and that is something that further is something, if I were newer to this to consider. Free VPN, I'm not knocking it - it is good, and I will check these other players out. This was a top contender for privacy in a security/'hacking' in a very 'paranoid' legit review of privacy/security services including VPN. SpiderOak was in that review, a while back as well for cloud based storage, which also is encrypted, and pretty damn secure- they don't know who I am ok with that. Better not lose your pw through, they won't help you - seriously.SImilarly to your discretion to a large degree is true with AirVPN, your privacy is valued at least I feel so, you can be as transparent as you wish or obscure as you wish. Thanks for a stimulating and informative article folks and author!!!! Great one to research for sure!

We didn’t find any problems when we tested other aspects of TorGuard’s performance. Each time we checked our location via IP address, it accurately resolved to the location of a TorGuard server. Neither our true IP address nor our location was exposed when we tested for DNS leaks and IPv6 leaks. TorGuard runs its own DNS servers—a requirement for all the VPNs we tested—so the routing that happens when you go to a website isn’t released to your ISP, Google, or anyone else. And since TorGuard doesn’t support IPv6, the app disables it completely, just like IVPN.


Any devices that accesses the internet is assigned an IP address. For us, that means our Internet Service Provider (ISP) assigned an IP address to your router. If you’re on WiFi, your individual devices have their own assigned IP addresses. Since your IP address comes from your ISP, it has your name, location, and all your web activity attached to it. If your ISP was ever hacked, that data could fall in the hands of a bad actor. And if compelled, your ISP could hand over your data, say, in compliance with a warrant. It could also issue warnings on behalf of copyright holders if you were engaging in piracy.
Overplay is easy to install and even easier to use. Its simple user interface is suitable for those who do not want complex features. All one needs to do is run the app and choose the country you want to connect to. It offers a very good speed, with any speed reduction hardly noticeable. As the software has server locations in 48 countries and over 14,000 IP addresses, anonymity is assured.
A NAT Firewall may offer robust benefits but users have reported frequent issues while using NAT for torrents and P2P file sharing. In addition, NAT firewall can significantly reduce your download speed. However, this issue can be resolved by Port Forwarding, which allows torrent traffic to pass through a specific port in NAT Firewall. The best VPN services mentioned in this guide offer port forwarding, that will allow you to download torrents faster from anywhere in the world.
Others argue it is unnecessary and, when using a torrenting VPN service, only serves to make torrenting more difficult and can even degrade user privacy. This is because other users sharing the same VPN IP address will all be limited to the same ports except for the one who chooses to port forward. That can make P2P activity more easy to trace back to a single user.
The service supports Windows, Mac, Android and iOS devices, but manual connection through Linux, BlackBerry, Boxee Box, HP WebOS or DD-WRT is also possible. It likewise allows users to use up to five devices using the account. PureVPN’s proprietary gigabit network ensures uptime and extremely fast speeds. It offers unlimited bandwidth, which is ideal for users who like video streaming or playing online games.
What is a VPN? VPN or Virtual Private Network is a secure private network that helps you keep your online identity invisible by replacing your original IP with one of its own. When you connect to a VPN, it encrypts all your traffic and passed it through a secure tunnel created by a military-graded protocol. With VPN all your communication is secure from hackers and any third party intruders. Why hide.me VPN? hide.me VPN is the world’s fastest VPN that offers unmatched privacy with highly advanced security features. You can subscribe to hide.me’s Free VPN that works equally amazing on Windows 10. We offer the easiest Free VPN solution which doesn’t require any Signup or Registration. Just install and start using it. Free Trial Features for Windows 10 -No Subscription or Credit Card Information required -3 Locations including (Singapore, Netherlands and Canada) -Auto-connect server option -Auto-Reconnect option -VPN App is supported in 15 different languages Free accounts offer 500MB limit for 2 weeks, which can be renewed infinite times. Plus & Premium Features for Windows 10 All features of FREE Plan as well as some additional features including -Unlimited Bandwidth -Unlimited data transfer limit for Premium plan -5 simultaneous logins in Premium plan -45 different VPN locations What Can I Do Using hide.me VPN You can do a lot many things using hide.me VPN including -Protect your device at public WiFi -Secure your online identity -Protect all your online activities
Each protocol on your computer operates on its own port (like a channel). This way your computer knows which incoming data belongs to which program. The problem is all data has to go through your router first. If your router has alot of devices connected to it, it may not be sure which data/ports to forward to each specific computer. This can cause data bottlenecks and slower speeds.

Any devices that accesses the internet is assigned an IP address. For us, that means our Internet Service Provider (ISP) assigned an IP address to your router. If you’re on WiFi, your individual devices have their own assigned IP addresses. Since your IP address comes from your ISP, it has your name, location, and all your web activity attached to it. If your ISP was ever hacked, that data could fall in the hands of a bad actor. And if compelled, your ISP could hand over your data, say, in compliance with a warrant. It could also issue warnings on behalf of copyright holders if you were engaging in piracy.

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