There is one way around any VPN device restrictions, however. If you want to protect all the devices on your network, you can use Hide My Ass's handy guide for installing VPN software on your router. Installing VPN on a router means that every single device on your network—from your laptop to your smart fridge—gets the benefit of VPN, and it uses only one of your licenses.

Private Internet Access' client interfaces aren't as flashy or cutesy as some other services' software, but they're clear and simple enough for newbies to start right away. A toggle switch reveals all the settings a VPN expert would ever want to play with. You can also skip Private Internet Access' software and connect directly to the servers, or use a third-party OpenVPN client.
We have a pretty comprehensive guide to BitTorrent, where we talk about P2P traffic, downloading files, selecting torrent repositories, and everything else in between. This will let you learn the basics, which is when you can read our articles on how to stay legal when torrenting as well as how to spot fake torrents. And we also shouldn’t forget our article on the best torrent search engines that will let you browse millions of files with ease.
Pay attention to server load: Just like a regular computer, the VPN server is bound by the laws of physics and the more that is being asked of it, the slower it will become. Many VPN clients will show you the load being placed on any given server as a percentage of its capacity. Choosing a server that is not under load will often yield faster speeds.

VPN services are entirely legal and legitimate in most countries. It's completely legal to mask your IP address and encrypt your internet traffic. There is nothing about using a VPN that's illegal and VPN services themselves do not and cannot do anything illegal. The only thing that's illegal is if you were to break the law while using a VPN - for instance if you were to infringe on someone's copyright. But that's the action of infringement that's illegal, not the use of the VPN.
Connecting to a VPN is fairly simple. In Windows, press the Windows key, type VPN, and click the Set up a virtual private network (VPN) connection option. (If you use Windows 8, you’ll have to click the Settings category after searching.) Use the wizard to enter the address and login credentials of the VPN service you want to use. You can then connect to and disconnect from VPNs using the network icon in the system tray – the same one where you manage the Wi-Fi networks you’re connected to.
Windscribe  offers unlimited device connections. Yes you heard that right! The reason is that unlike the others above on this list, it doesn't offer unlimited data. So you're limited by bandwidth and data, not by devices. You get 10GB every month, and there's a free plan also but that only allows one device. There are apps for Windows, Mac and iOS but not Android, and the service also offers browser add-ons with useful features such as ad-blocking. Short range performance (to US sites) is good, but we noticed lag with transatlantic connections. However, if you’re looking to protect the data from a whole bunch of devices - an office, perhaps, or just a smart home - the support for unlimited connections is a real stand-out feature.

Price: Free TorVPN users are limited to 1GB/mo downloaded before they’re cut off, and Premium accounts start at 5 EUR/mo ($7mo) for 5GB/mo and go up to 30 EUR/mo ($38/mo) for 100GB. Keep in mind they have a no-refunds policy, and that even though you ride the Tor network, they’re a separate entity from the Tor Project. You can read more about their pricing and plans here.


IPVanish differs in the types of users that will appreciate it the most. It has a lot of special features, like IP address cycling and a Kill Switch, but these come at the expense of a clunky and unattractive user interface. This makes it less friendly for beginners or users who want something simple and effective, but can provide more options and configurations for the truly technical user. It also allows connection from up to 5 devices simultaneously, adding to its appeal as a robust product.
Download torrent is legal as long as you are downloading the legal content. The problem occurred when you download illegal content through uTorrent or any other torrent client. Because uTorrent is not safe to download content without the permission of content owner. uTorrent store users logs which can be used in future for legal purposes if required by company. But VPN torrent solve this issue because VPN hides IP address.

All that being said, we currently name TorGuard as the fastest VPN service. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests. Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect.

Subscribing to CyberGhost is a superb way to introduce yourself to the world of VPNs at a very low price point. There is no bandwidth limit, encryption is great and setting up the service is easy. CyberGhost’s user-friendly apps makes connecting to the VPN simple and straightforward. CyberGhost is based both in Romania and in Germany, the latter being responsible for most of the software development. With both teams united by a common credo for internet anonymity, CyberGhost is a major supporter and promoter of civil rights, a free society and an uncensored internet culture. Our kind of folks!
Because few VPN companies offer live support, we appreciate when they at least provide easy-to-follow resources on their websites. Detailed setup guides with step-by-step instructions are available for every platform IVPN supports, and it breaks down troubleshooting advice into language that’s easy to understand. ExpressVPN also has clear, helpful support articles, but other services aren’t as straightforward. It’s harder to find the right information on TorGuard’s support site, and its articles aren’t as novice-friendly. If you need to submit a ticket for a specific problem, you can expect a quick response from all the companies we tested—IVPN and TorGuard both responded to us in minutes, and PIA took the longest at one day. ExpressVPN was the only one of our finalists that offered tech support over live chat. (Other companies provide live chat only for sales and signup support.)
Even if none of the above really sound right to you, you can still benefit from using a VPN. You should definitely use one when you travel or work on an untrusted network (read: a network you don’t own, manage, or trust who manages.) That means opening your laptop at the coffee shop and logging in to Facebook or using your phone’s Wi-Fi to check your email at the airport can all potentially put you at risk.

The first factor when determining the privacy of user information over a VPN is where the service is based. Each country comes with its own set of regulations, some requiring user data to be stored for a certain number of days. A VPN based in a country like Switzerland, with great privacy laws and no invasive government agencies, will provide some advantages on this front.


Most of the time, you're likely going to connect to a VPN service that's near your actual location. Doing so will generally ensure better speed and performance. But if you connect to a VPN server in a different location, you can make it appear as if your computer is somewhere it isn't. That's handy for journalists and political activists operating in repressive countries who must use a VPN to "tunnel" past censors, but it's also handy for streaming region-locked content online.
The number of servers and the location of a VPN company's servers can have a noticeable impact on performance. Companies with only a handful of servers must funnel more customers into crowded servers, reducing the sliver of the bandwidth pie available to each person. Similarly, if a company only has a few locations for its servers, it can mean connecting to an entirely different continent just to get online. For that reason, we pay careful attention to how many servers are offered, and whether there's a good degree of geographic diversity in those servers' placement.
Using a web Proxy server allows you to access content that may be blocked or restricted by local governments. You can use one to gain access to these websites and content. It also allows you to surf the web more privately meaning what your browsing (in that tab only) cannot be tracked. However, your connection is not encrypted unless you use a VPN.
Hide.me VPN takes your security seriously, giving you advanced protection by encrypting your data so you can use the web safely, wherever you are. It masks your IP address to keep you hidden and stop internet service providers and hackers from spying on you or tracking your activity online. Hide.me VPN even adopts a zero logs policy, which means they don't store any logs of your online activity.
Tunnel endpoints must be authenticated before secure VPN tunnels can be established. User-created remote-access VPNs may use passwords, biometrics, two-factor authentication or other cryptographic methods. Network-to-network tunnels often use passwords or digital certificates. They permanently store the key to allow the tunnel to establish automatically, without intervention from the administrator.
Not all mobile VPN apps are created equal. In fact, most VPN providers offer different services (and sometimes, different servers) for their mobile offerings than they do for their desktop counterparts. We're pleased to see that NordVPN and Private Internet Access provide the same excellent selection of servers regardless of platform. These apps received an Editors' Choice nod both for desktop VPN apps and Android VPN apps.

Aside from providing an exceptional VPN server for encrypting traffic, Speedify leverages all types of available internet connection to increase bandwidth, bolster internet speeds, and lower latency. This results in a smooth and reliable connection on any platform, whether using mobile devices or a desktop. This is achieved through its Channel Bonding functionality that combines all types of internet connections, including WiFI, VPN, 3G, and, 4G.

Our VPN-issued IP address was never blacklisted by websites like those of Yelp and Target, but we were unable to access Netflix and BBC iPlayer while connected to TorGuard. No VPN offers a reliable way to access these streaming services, though: All of the VPNs we tried were blocked by Netflix, and of the four that could access BBC content on the first day, two were blocked the next.
When testing a virtual private network, or VPN, we always consider the service's price, privacy, and technology. Hide.me does well in all of those areas, offering an affordable, secure service with a good privacy policy. But while the service looks great on paper, its performance and its app didn't blow us away in testing. Hide.me will serve you well if you need a low-cost service, but we continue to recommend Editors' Choice winners NordVPN, Private Internet Access, and TunnelBear, all of which are powerful and easy to use.

A VPN client is software that runs on your device in order to securely connect it to a VPN server. All major platforms (Windows, macOS, Android, iOS, and Linux) come with a built-in VPN client that can be configured manually, although OpenVPN always requires a third party client to be installed. Most VPN services now offer custom clients and apps, which are the easiest way to use their service as they come pre-configured with all the correct settings. They also typically offer a range of funky and useful features that are not available by simply manually configuring the built-in VPN client. To clear up any confusion, a ''VPN client'' and a ''VPN app'' are exactly the same thing. Traditionally, the word client is used for desktop software and the word app for mobile software, but it is becoming increasingly common to talk about VPN apps on the desktop. The terms are interchangeable.
Any devices that accesses the internet is assigned an IP address. For us, that means our Internet Service Provider (ISP) assigned an IP address to your router. If you’re on WiFi, your individual devices have their own assigned IP addresses. Since your IP address comes from your ISP, it has your name, location, and all your web activity attached to it. If your ISP was ever hacked, that data could fall in the hands of a bad actor. And if compelled, your ISP could hand over your data, say, in compliance with a warrant. It could also issue warnings on behalf of copyright holders if you were engaging in piracy.
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