Security is second to none with NordVPN. Its kills switch feature always monitors traffic between devices and the VPN servers. If for some reason, the data stream breaks, the kill switch will automatically terminate the connection, ensuring that your traffic is protected from prying eyes. Also, a DNS leak feature changes your DNS to point to the VPN server, ensuring that hackers cannot steal data from your default DNS.

Well I mostly use Zenmate Chrome extension if I need to unblock site or streaming normally its free and fast. I have used IPVanish VPN and its really great. IPVanish offer fast speed, data encryption, protocols, features, multiple IPs, gaming support etc. If you guys need suggestion and recommendation for best VPN you can visit bestvpnservice.com for premium VPN provider reviews and discount details.
I don't see my fave VPN (Easy-Hide-IP) listed here. I have tried Nord VPN and you really need to know a lot about VPNs and your computer to use it. I have used Tunnel Bear but their New York, N.Y. IP Address is recognized by Amazon as a VPN. So, No Amazon Prime movies for me. I contacted Tunnel Bear customer service, but, they don't seem to understand the problem with their IP address being known by Amazon as a VPN.
With VPNs you can access streaming services which are usually blocked to overseas viewers. You can do this by simply connecting to a VPN server in the appropriate country. Unsurprisingly, both Netflix and BBC iPlayer attempt to block VPN users. These blocks are often ineffective, and many providers have found ways around them. For more information about unblocking the most common services see our VPN for Netflix and VPN for BBC iPlayer guides.

When you connect to a VPN, you create a secure, encrypted tunnel between your computer and the VPN remote server. The data is essentially gibberish to anyone who intercepts it. Your ISP, government or hackers won’t know which websites you visit. And conversely, the websites you visit won’t know where you are. Typically, logging in to a VPN is as easy as entering a password and clicking a button on a VPN client or a web browser extension.
"ISPs are in a position to see a lot of what you do online. They kind of have to be, since they have to carry all of your traffic," explains Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Jeremy Gillula. "Unfortunately, this means that preventing ISP tracking online is a lot harder than preventing other third-party tracking—you can't just install [the EFF's privacy-minded browser add-on] Privacy Badger or browse in incognito or private mode."

HTTPS is a powerful tool that everyone should use because it helps keep sensitive browsing private at no extra cost to the people using it. But like most security standards, it has its own problems too. That little lock icon in your browser bar, which indicates the HTTPS connection, relies on a certificate “signed” by a recognized authority. But there are hundreds of such authorities, and as the EFF says, “the security of HTTPS is only as strong as the practices of the least trustworthy/competent CA [certificate authorities].” Plus, there have been plenty of news stories covering minor and even major vulnerabilities in the system. Some security professionals have worried about those least-competent authorities, spurring groups to improve on the certificate standards and prompting browsers to add warnings when you come across certificates and sites that don’t withstand scrutiny. So HTTPS is good—but like anything, it isn’t perfect.
A popular VPN service, TorGuard has servers in over 50 countries and enables users to unblock websites and get around censorship. This ensures that wherever you are in the world, there is bound to be a TorGuard server near you. By default, the service enables users to make five simultaneous connections. This lets users run the service on all their devices. To better protect users, the service has a kill switch. However, this feature is not available on mobile devices. Likewise, a Domain Name System leak protection works on Windows and OS X.
Second is the number of servers. Unless you purchase a VPN server yourself (which you can do!), you'll have to share that server with other people using the VPN service. For each person added to the server, your slice of the bandwidth pie shrinks a bit. The more servers a company has on hand, the less likely you are to find yourself crowded in with a bunch of other downloaders. If you're keen to have a VPN server to yourself, you can purchase static IP addresses from TorGuard VPN, or take advantage of KeepSolid VPN Unlimited's Personal VPN Server offering. Or roll your own VPN with Outline.
When we initially researched and tested VPNs for this guide in early 2018, technical and legal reasons prevented app developers from using the OpenVPN protocol in apps released through Apple’s iOS app store. During 2018, both the technical and licensing hurdles were removed, and VPN providers started adding OpenVPN connections to their iOS apps. We’ve already noted that our top pick, IVPN, has added it, as have ExpressVPN and PIA. In a future update, we’ll specifically test these upgraded iOS apps, but in the meantime the updated IVPN app has worked as promised for several Wirecutter staffers who use it regularly. Because this OpenVPN support makes it much easier for anyone with Apple devices to create a reliably secure VPN connection, we wouldn’t recommend a service without it to anyone with an iPhone or iPad.
Perfect Privacy currently holds the top spot as the best VPN for torrenting. Their network is comprised entirely of dedicated, bare-metal servers that offer excellent speed, security, and full IPv6 support (you will get both an IPv4 and Ipv6 address). Every server in their network also supports obfuscation features (Stealth VPN), multi-hop VPN chains, and port forwarding. Finally, Perfect Privacy offers excellent bandwidth at all times for torrenting, which you can verify in real-time on their server status page.
Setting up a Virtual Private Network is a straightforward process. It's often as simple as entering a username and sever address. The dominant smartphones can configure Virtual Private Networks using PPTP and L2TP/IPsec protocols. All major operating systems can configure PPTP VPN connections. OpenVPN and L2TP/IPsec protocols require a small open source application (OpenVPN) and certificate download respectively.

If you listen to mainstream media, the only reason for a Virtual Private Network is to erase your online browsing habits and conceal illicit or immoral activity. There is a systematic campaign afoot, designed to blacken the concept of the VPN and ensure that nobody except criminals and perverts would even think of using it. Choosing a name like “Hide My Ass” doesn’t really give the image of a “white hat” service, either. But a VPN is like a gun – it’s not what it is, it’s how it’s used that makes the difference.
Most services provide perfectly adequate internet speed when in use, and can even handle streaming HD video. However, 4K video and other data-intensive tasks like gaming over a VPN are another story. Some VPN services, such as NordVPN, have started to roll out specialty servers for high-bandwidth activities. And nearly every service we have tested includes a tool to connect you with the fastest available network. Of course, you can always limit your VPN use to when you're not on a trusted network.
Even though Tor is free, we don’t think it’s the best option for most people. If you aren’t familiar with Tor, this handy interactive graphic shows how it protects an Internet connection, and this series goes into more detail about how Tor works. Runa Sandvik, a former researcher with The Tor Project who is now part of the information security team at The New York Times (parent company of Wirecutter), described it as “a tool that allows users to remain anonymous and uncensored.” When we asked expert Alec Muffett about whether he personally used a VPN, he told us he actually spent most of his work time using Tor. But Tor has a reputation for slow connections, can be blocked by some websites, and isn’t suitable for some peer-to-peer applications like BitTorrent.
Hide My Ass (also known as HMA) is a virtual private network (VPN) that allows you to access the web anonymously from any location around the world. It works by forming an encrypted link between your PC and the internet so as to stream content much more securely. The software is compatible with Android, Windows, Linux, iOS and Mac devices. Hide My Ass is considered to be a niche leader and is one of the most recognizable names in the VPN industry.
When I review VPNs, I read the company's privacy policy and speak with representatives in order to better understand how your data is used and stored. In the case of Hide My Ass, the company should be commended on its clear privacy policy. It says that Hide My Ass logs your username, the timestamp of connection and disconnection, the amount of data transmitted, your actual IP address, and the IP address of the server you connected to. This isn't radically different from what's offered by other services. In fact, it's very similar to Golden Frog VyprVPN's policy.

There is a phrase that tells “you get what you paid for!”. Some torrent users may search for free torrent vpn but there are many problems with free VPN. Running a VPN serervice costs money for dedicated servers. Free VPN keeps your browsing logs, Emails, Personal details etc for marketing purpose and the download speed is very slow due to large number of users. . Also most free VPNs don’t support torrenting, if you use torrent for a long time, they will detect and ban you. To protect your privacy you should never fall for FREE VPN for torrent. You can use some premium torrent vpn that doesn’t keep browsing logs, have torrent optimized servers and gives blazing fast download speed. Below you can find some of the best torrent vpn service that I have personally tested for torrenting. I know how important it is to have faster download speed, so you can use these vpn service for torrent download without any problem.
Hide My Ass uses OpenVPN on Windows, with an older version of the app that supports L2TP, and PPTP, too. There are also two different versions of the macOS app that, taken together, support IPSec (IKEv1 and v2), L2TP, and PPTP. Note that these older versions of the app are being phased out by the developer. The iOS version uses only IPSec, and the Android app uses only OpenVPN.
Hotspot Shield VPN works in most countries, but that doesn’t mean it’s always legal to use a VPN in a specific country. If you have any doubts about the legality of using a VPN in a certain country, always consult a qualified lawyer because laws can change quickly. If you’re still unsure, then it’s best to play it safe and abide by the most conservative guidelines of a country.
The list of available server locations offered by Hide My Ass is particularly noteworthy because it covers regions often ignored by other VPN companies. It has, for example, numerous server locations across the continent of Africa—a rarity among VPN companies. It also maintains servers in China, Russia, and Turkey, which have particularly repressive internet policies.

VPN (or virtual private network) services create a secure, encrypted connection between your computer and a VPN server at another location. That type of secure connection is a worthwhile investment for anyone who wants to wrap their data in an extra layer of privacy and security, especially when connecting to public Wi-Fi networks. But a VPN is not a magic bullet for Internet security and won’t make you anonymous online.
One of the biggest things that can put people off the idea of using a VPN is that they slow down your internet. This is mainly because you are adding an extra leg to the journey your data must take to reach its destination (via the VPN server). These days good VPN services are very fast and if you connect to a server near to you, you will often get 90% or more of your raw internet connection speed. 
The IVPN app's default settings are great for most people, who should be happy just smashing the Connect button and not fiddling with settings. On a desktop or an Android device, the company supports only the OpenVPN protocol we recommend and uses AES 256-bit encryption (what we consider the standard at this point). Our budget pick, TorGuard, defaults to the weaker (but also acceptable) AES 128-bit encryption unless you manually change it.
Of course, there are more than just phones and computers in a home. Game systems, tablets, and smart home devices such as light bulbs and fridges all need to connect to the internet. Many of these things can't run VPN software on their own, nor can they be configured to connect to a VPN through their individual settings. In these cases, you may be better off configuring your router to connect with the VPN of your choice. By adding VPN protection to your router, you secure the traffic of every gadget connected to that router. And the router—and everything protected by it—uses just one of your licenses. Nearly all of the companies we have reviewed offer software for most consumer routers and even routers with preinstalled VPN software, making it even easier to add this level of protection.
All that being said, we currently name TorGuard as the fastest VPN service. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests. Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect.
In light of that information, when asked if even the best VPN services could secure communications against government intrusion into private traffic, Amul Kalia, an analyst for digital privacy and online advocacy group the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said, “If you mean the NSA, there are probably ways that the agency can get to you if they really want to. But if you’re interested in preventing passive snooping of your Internet traffic, then you’re probably fine using a secure VPN.”

Hide.me has two pricing tiers. The first is Plus and offers one simultaneous connection and a maximum of 75GB of data transfer per month. The second tier is Premium and offers five simultaneous connections and unlimited data transfer. Plus is priced at $60 per year and Premium is $120. The Premium tier is pretty much the standard service you’d get with any VPN, making Hide.me one of the most expensive VPNs we’ve looked at.


Virtual LAN (VLAN) is a Layer 2 technique that allow for the coexistence of multiple local area network (LAN) broadcast domains, interconnected via trunks using the IEEE 802.1Q trunking protocol. Other trunking protocols have been used but have become obsolete, including Inter-Switch Link (ISL), IEEE 802.10 (originally a security protocol but a subset was introduced for trunking), and ATM LAN Emulation (LANE).
To narrow the hundreds of VPN providers down to a manageable list, we first looked at reviews from dedicated sites like vpnMentor and TorrentFreak, research and recommendations from noncommercial sources such as That One Privacy Site and privacytools.io, and user experiences and tips on various subreddits and technology-focused websites like Lifehacker and Ars Technica. We settled on 32 VPNs that were repeatedly recommended. From there, we dug into the details of how each one handled issues from technology to subscriptions:
Tunnel endpoints must be authenticated before secure VPN tunnels can be established. User-created remote-access VPNs may use passwords, biometrics, two-factor authentication or other cryptographic methods. Network-to-network tunnels often use passwords or digital certificates. They permanently store the key to allow the tunnel to establish automatically, without intervention from the administrator.

Do you want to watch your favorite sports teams? A VPN for streaming sports is your solution. The lucrative nature of sports licensing means that television channels are forbidden from showing games that are outside of their region or license. VPNs like Express VPN are a great way to watch your favorite teams securely and privately because you will be able to stream games at high-quality and top speed. A simple VPN download can hence save the day for you.


Express VPN is positioned as a safe bet for the torrenting Internet user. Being based in the Virgin Islands, and having been in business since 2009, the company has great policies on privacy and has a track record that highlights its devotion to online privacy. They store no user logs that track online activity back to a specific IP; however, they do say that they “may collect” information on total daily data usage, times connected to their service, and choice of server location.
With a StrongVPN account, customers have the ability to choose which server location they want, even down to the specific city. This type of personalized, user-friendly service is also seen with their unlimited server switching, as well as the ability to have up to six simultaneous connections on different devices. StrongVPN supports Mac, Windows, iOs, Android, and even multiple routers, which is a huge plus. 
Logging Policy: In our selection, there are only VPNs that do not log the user’s activity. All these providers state very clearly in their privacy policy that they do not log anything. In case any government or agency asks the VPN company for user logs, they have nothing to show them. In our opinion, a VPN that saves the activity of their users is not respecting online anonymity. Therefore, it does not deserve a place on our list.
If you like watching live video streaming and downloading torrents, NordVPN is a great one-size-fits-all VPN that secures your connection with powerful tools and blazing speed. Unlike other premium VPNs, you don't have to pay that much to get high speeds and security. NordVPN swears not to keep any logs, to encrypt exchanges in 2048 bits, to have their own DNS servers in order to prevent leakage, and to have a " kill switch" to stop some applications in case of accidental disconnection.      

If you’ve played with torrents before you’ll know it’s a hobby that requires a degree of patience. Large files can take hours, days or even weeks to download. If your VPN connection drops for even a moment during the download, your IP address could be exposed, revealing your true identity. If you’re serious about protecting yourself when torrenting, the most important feature to look out for is a ‘kill switch’. A kill switch is part of your VPN's software that, when enabled, will make sure your IP address isn't exposed by instantly killing your connection if your VPN connection fails.
As for the geographic diversity of Hide.me's servers, the company has done a fairly good job covering the Earth. Many VPN companies ignore South America, India, and all of Africa, but Hide.me has a few locations in these regions. It also have servers in China and Turkey, regions known to censor the web. Hide.me does not offer any servers in Russia, but NordVPN (and others) do.
No company came closer to being a pick than ExpressVPN. It has a huge server network that performed well in our tests, plus easy-to-use applications on tons of platforms, and strong security technologies in place. A representative answered all our questions about company operations at length—except one. As noted in a PCWorld review of the service, ExpressVPN chooses not to disclose the company’s leadership or ownership. The company representative told us that this policy enabled ExpressVPN to build a private and secure product without compromise. “We think that this approach has been effective until now and that coupled with a stellar VPN product, we have succeeded in gaining a solid reputation in our industry. We are fortunate to be trusted by the many users worldwide who choose ExpressVPN.”
Several issues I have had...two services did not work consistently with Outlook smtp email and I had to cancel the subscription. One of them all of a sudden no longer supported Netgear routers - which I had been using !!! I had to flash the router with DDWRT firmware and am still in the process of implementing. So be careful out there. Use the free trial time to check everything out.
A VPN client on a remote user's computer or mobile device connects to a VPN gateway on the organization's network. The gateway typically requires the device to authenticate its identity. Then, it creates a network link back to the device that allows it to reach internal network resources -- e.g., file servers, printers and intranets -- as though the gateway is on the network locally.
Although it has a no logs policy, the vendor collects user activity data and could opt to share them with third parties. The service can be used for torrenting but the company warns against copyright infringements. One weak spot is the service’s customer support. It has no live chat support and it takes more than 24 hours to get a reply. However, a knowledge base is available in the company’s website.
Our table and reviews detail both where each service is based and whether it retains any connection logs. However, logging isn’t the be-all and end-all of VPN security. We’ve restricted ourselves to testing services from reputable companies with a proven track record, but it’s impossible to truly know how much faith can be put in any organisation’s claims about their logging policy.
A virtual private network, or VPN, is an encrypted connection over the Internet from a device to a network. The encrypted connection helps ensure that sensitive data is safely transmitted. It prevents unauthorized people from eavesdropping on the traffic and allows the user to conduct work remotely.  VPN technology is widely used in corporate environments.
Some VPNs have tools that are particularly useful for torrenting. NordVPN is one of several companies that offer static IP addresses for purchase, which can desirable in some circumstances. TorGuard VPN has built its entire reputation around protecting torrenters. In addition to the usual VPN protection, TorGuard also offers static IP addresses and access to special high-bandwidth connections, for an additional fee.
Even the services that do allow torrenting often have restrictions. Some, for example, may require that you only use BitTorrent when connected to specific VPN servers. NordVPN labels the servers where torrenting is acceptable. TorGuard VPN, on the other hand, does not make any distinction about user traffic, so you can torrent to your heart's content. Note that pretty much every VPN service that allows torrenting also explicitly forbids breaking copyright law, or otherwise abusing the service.
Before you decide which best home VPN network client you want to download and install on your device, take some time to ask yourself a few questions, the most important of them being “what exactly do you need the VPN for?” For example, do you want a VPN for your Windows computer? Regardless of the platform or firmware that your devices operate on, certain aspects of a VPN are critical and should be considered before making the purchase. Regardless of why you need a VPN, unlimited access to all the Internet has to offer is of top importance when making your decision. With a VPN like Express VPN or NordVPN, you will be able to surf securely and privately. There are a number of features you might want from a VPN - unlimited number of devices, fast surfing speeds, Android and iOS apps, major VPN protocols. All are important in choosing the right VPN for you. Check out our guide to choosing the right unlimited VPN for your needs to help you decide which of the best VPNs in 2018 is right for you. 
Basically, torrenting isn't easy to track and the aforementioned legal entities and entertainment conglomerates know this. To hold illegal pirates accountable, these parties will often go straight to the ISP and request data logs of your online activity. If you're living in a country with data retention laws and you're not using a VPN with a "no logging" policy, it's the slammer for you, chief.
All connections are securely encrypted, and you can even opt to obfuscate traffic using a special “Scramble” feature that disguises OpenVPN connections. DNS leak protection and a kill switch are built into the apps. StrongVPN has long been a favorite among users in China, and its recent upgrades make it appeal to a wider audience including torrenters.
With an ever-increasing crowd of competitors, many VPN companies have begun adding features outside of network protection. These can range from simple ad-blocking to TunnelBear's standalone password manager and ad-blocking apps. A representative from Hide.me tells me that the company doesn't currently offer additional features, and made the case that ad- and malware-blocking actually further diminishes speeds.
NordVPN is envied for its impressive security ensured by the support for all the usual security protocols, an automatic kill switch, 256-bit encryption, as well as double data encryption. This particular feature makes sure that your data goes through two separate VPN servers, thus adding another layer of security. If you’re worried about your privacy, don’t be. NordVPN has a clear no-logs policy.
Hi Mihael, could you please specify how the script works and if it only requires access to http? In general, the script should work the same way after you connect to our service. Only the IP will change. If possible, please contact us at info@hidemyass.com to provide us with more details and we will advise about customized settings, if needed. Thanks :)
A lot of people started using a VPN to evade geo-restrictions. But despite its forbidden benefits to users outside the US, a VPN is a great tool that can protect you and enhance your online experience over the internet by providing you with sufficient security and privacy. When it comes to selecting the best VPN, you have plenty of choices. There are many cost-effective VPN options, and all of them will vary in monthly offerings. Choosing the best VPN is easier once you narrow down the competition. The best indication of a good VPN service provider is that they have the right security and the right support in place for you.
As you can see, disguising your IP address is vital for bittorrent users. All VPNs mask your real IP address with that of the VPN server. Unfortunately, not all of them do a very good job. Most VPNs don’t protect against certain types of leaks that can expose your real IP address to third parties. These include DNS leaks, IPv6 leaks, and WebRTC leaks.
When you're using a public Wi-Fi network, even a password-protected one, a VPN is your best friend. That’s because using public hotspots can be rife with hazards. From man-in-the-middle attacks to Wi-Fi sniffing, there are many different hacking methods that snoopers use to intercept your Internet traffic and steal your social media or banking passwords, files and photos.
The student/worker. This person has responsibilities to attend to, and uses a VPN provided by their school or company to access resources on their network when they’re at home or traveling. In most cases, this person already has a free VPN service provided to them, so they’re not exactly shopping around. Also, if they’re worried about security, they can always fire up their VPN when using airport or cafe WI-Fi to ensure no one’s snooping on their connection. Photo by Ed Yourdon.
HMA! Pro VPN is a leading internet encryption service based on virtual private network technology. Whilst VPN’s are predominantly used to remotely connect people to localized computer networks, the underlying security advantages in the form of encryption can be used to provide online security and privacy services. Consumers and businesses connect to HMA’s worldwide VPN servers to tunnel their internet connections through HMA's servers to achieve increased security and privacy.
If you're of the iPhone persuasion, there are a few other caveats to consider for a mobile VPN. Some iPhone VPN apps don't use OpenVPN, even if the VPN service that made the app supports the protocol. That's because Apple requires additional vetting if a company wants to include OpenVPN with its app. VPN app developers have slowly started jumping through those extra hoops and are bringing support for protocols such as OpenVPN to iOS.
"ISPs are in a position to see a lot of what you do online. They kind of have to be, since they have to carry all of your traffic," explains Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Jeremy Gillula. "Unfortunately, this means that preventing ISP tracking online is a lot harder than preventing other third-party tracking—you can't just install [the EFF's privacy-minded browser add-on] Privacy Badger or browse in incognito or private mode."
TrackStop – Ads are basically advanced tracking to record your browsing, so you can be hit with targeted ads based on your online activity. To protect users against this threat, Perfect Privacy developed TrackStop, which is a powerful filter that blocks advertising, tracking, and malicious domains at the VPN server level. It ranked the best among different VPN ad blockers I tested.
The list of available server locations offered by Hide My Ass is particularly noteworthy because it covers regions often ignored by other VPN companies. It has, for example, numerous server locations across the continent of Africa—a rarity among VPN companies. It also maintains servers in China, Russia, and Turkey, which have particularly repressive internet policies.

I am not sure VPNs really do as advertised. The "modem" provided by your ISP is preset to go to the servers of the ISP. Correct? Usually, the ISP will not give you access to the settings within the "modem". Correct? So, if traffic is still going thru your ISP, are we actually bypassing data caps? And wouldn't this also apply to DNS servers? "Modem" still has to go thru ISP. I understand how the web site being addressed is fooled, but none of this does anything to/for the ISP.
That attitude to the safety and privacy of personal data creates an enormous risk when it comes to online security. Public Wi-Fi networks, which are ubiquitous and convenient, are unfortunately also highly convenient for attackers looking to compromise your personal information. How do you know, for example, that "starbucks_wifi_real" is actually the Wi-Fi network for the coffee shop? Anyone could have created that network, and they may have done so in order to lure victims into disclosing personal information over it. In fact, a popular security researcher prank is to create a network with the same name as a free, popular service and see how many devices will automatically connect because it appears safe.
When you use bit-torrent software your IP address is exposed to the whole world. Anybody downloading the same content can view your IP address and track you to infect your home network. Torrent files are often bundled with Virus and Malware, so there is a good chance that you infect your computer with Trojan Horse type virus. Now these virus application requires a direct connection between you and the controlling hacking device implemented by the hacker. It can be a server or a simple computer. Now if you use VPN for torrenting then no direct connection possible between you and the hacker’s machine which prevents you from hack attack. Use a good antivirus software for your own safety.
ExpressVPN is also one of the best VPN services available for streaming. Whether you are using a VPN with Kodi or streaming Netflix with a VPN, ExpressVPN offers great apps for streaming devices and high-speed bandwidth for HD videos and downloads. Their customer service is also top-notch, with 24/7 live chat support and a 30 day money-back guarantee with all subscription plans. [Learn more >]

Due to licensing restrictions, iOS developers previously couldn’t implement OpenVPN connections directly inside their applications. Since that changed in mid-2018, a few providers, including IVPN and PrivateInternetAccess, have added native OpenVPN support to their apps. This makes a secure connection on any Apple device much easier than the old method that required a clunky third-party application and complicated connection profiles. Though we haven’t done performance tests on any updated iOS apps yet, our limited use of the updated IVPN app worked without any problems. Going forward, we wouldn’t consider a VPN provider that doesn’t include native OpenVPN support on iOS.

We’ve shown you how to roll your own VPN using Hamachi, and even how to set up Privoxy to secure your web browsing once you have your personal VPN set up. Hamachi isn’t the only option: you can also download and configure OpenVPN (a free SSL VPN) on your own home server,, or if you have a router that supports it, enable OpenVPN on your home router so you can connect back to it when you’re abroad. Combined with Privoxy, you get the privacy and anonymity benefits of a VPN without spending a dime.
Whereas most providers say they log nothing, that’s not always the case. Some record very little data like the day you subscribed, the amount of data you’ve consumed, and delete those logs when you end the session. Other providers log your IP address, the servers you used, and store those logs. If they’re based in the US, UK or any other country with data retention laws, they can be compelled to hand over that data to law enforcement.

Connecting to a VPN is fairly simple. In Windows, press the Windows key, type VPN, and click the Set up a virtual private network (VPN) connection option. (If you use Windows 8, you’ll have to click the Settings category after searching.) Use the wizard to enter the address and login credentials of the VPN service you want to use. You can then connect to and disconnect from VPNs using the network icon in the system tray – the same one where you manage the Wi-Fi networks you’re connected to.


Hide.me VPN for Windows is a virtual private network (VPN) utility that helps prevent others seeing your internet traffic. With this service, you can browse and download, evading restrictions on content and protecting the privacy of your data. With high download speeds and a variety of different service plans, hide.me is a leading name in the world of VPN services.

Firefox private browsing with tracking protection is great at protecting you from invasive trackers and keeping your browser history secret, but when you surf the web, you leave footprints that Firefox can’t erase — your IP address is logged at the sites you visit and your ISP may keep records. That usually isn’t an issue, but the sites you visit could expose you to unwanted attention from government agencies or even hackers. A VPN can hide those footprints from prying eyes and add an extra layer of security against hackers.


In this day and age internet users are being threatened from every angle. Cyber thieves are always on the hunt, trying to steal easily accessible unsecured data, and e-commerce companies will do their very best to bombard you with invasive and annoying ads. Many of these ads are based on your browsing history and directed straight at you, by simply using a VPN and encrypting your data, you can reduce the amount of spam mail and targeted ads you receive.
PIA is based in the US, so is not a provider for the more NSA-phobic out there. However, it keeps no logs, which is a claim that it has been tested in a court of law! And although optional, its security can be first rate. Its desktop software supports multiple security options, a VPN kill switch, DNS leak protection, and port forwarding. Up to 5 simultaneous connections are permitted and the VPN boasts great connection speeds. P2P is permitted on all servers located across 29 countries.
IVPN also performed well in our speed tests. Though it wasn’t always the fastest in the 54 measurements we took on each service, it ranked near the top on many servers at different times of the week—especially compared with the most trustworthy services. Private Internet Access, one of the most visible, privacy-focused VPNs, had slower speeds when connecting to most servers and less reliable connections than IVPN. For US servers (which we expected to be the fastest locations since we tested from California), IVPN ranked behind only OVPN and TorGuard. We liked OVPN—especially its speed results—but we thought that company’s small team and small selection of servers and locations were too limiting for some people. (Read more in the Competition section.) Though TorGuard edged out IVPN in this test, the difference wasn’t big enough to affect our everyday browsing. And because we tested each application at its default settings, TorGuard’s faster speeds were partially thanks to its default 128-bit encryption; IVPN offers only more secure, but often slower, 256-bit encryption.

For local VPN issues, you have a couple of options. First, consider installing VPN software on your router and not using a VPN on your local machines. Alternatively, many VPN services offer browser plug-ins that only encrypt your browser traffic. That's not ideal from a security perspective, but it's useful when all you need to secure is your browser information.
VyprVPN is one of very few providers to own and control its network infrastructure. Most VPN providers use 3rd-party companies to host their VPN servers, but not Vypr. This is a big draw for privacy conscious users because their data is protected from end-to-end and never leaves VyprVPN's site. We strongly recommend avoiding its PPTP-only basic plan, but VyprVPN otherwise offers a great selection of features, such as a SmartDNS service, robust customer support and port selection. VyprVPNs “Chameleon” stealth technology is great for defeating censorship in places such such as China or Vietnam.
For the uninitiated, torrenting is a way of sharing files peer-to-peer (P2P). A single user uploads a file, which is broken up into smaller pieces called "packets". These packets are then distributed to everyone downloading the same file (leechers). Once the file download is complete on the downloader's end, the packet is then distributed among other leechers. This makes the transfer of big files faster and more secure as smaller packets are being transferred from various locations (rather than in one big chunk from a single server). It's like a huge network of little bricklayers anonymously working together to construct the file that ends up on your computer – which, if you're in Australia, is probably the latest episode of Game of Thrones.

Although it’s often mentioned in one breath with many other torrenting-friendly VPNs, the glory days of IPVanish are over, as you can read in our IPVanish review. The service made its mark in the early days of copyright tracking, but since then has made few improvements and at time of writing it’s unclear whether it does, in fact, make your IP vanish. Take care when using this service.


In short, it's time to start thinking about protecting your personal information. That's where virtual private networks, or VPNs, come in. These services use simple software to protect your internet connection, and they give you greater control over how you appear online, too. While you might never have heard of VPN services, they are valuable tools that you should understand and use. So who needs a VPN? The short answer is that everyone does. Even Mac users can benefit from a VPN.
Anonymity and Privacy: In like manner to a web proxy, the VPN service is also a hit for customers who wish to gain a measure of anonymity on the internet and also protect their identity and privacy. However, unlike a web proxy, the VPN service affects all applications on your computer, not just your web browser. This, therefore, enables users to protect their entire internet connection and not just their web browser traffic.
Establishing one of these secure connections—say you want to log into your private corporate network remotely—is surprisingly easy. The user first connects to the public internet through an ISP, then initiates a VPN connection with the company VPN server using client software. And that's it! The client software on the server establishes the secure connection, grants the remote user access to the internal network and—bing, bang, boom—you're up to your elbows in TPS reports. The horror.
Reason #2 - Logistical/Legal Headaches: Not everybody uses bittorrent responsibly. Allowing unrestricted torrent downloads on a VPN network can bring legal pressure, both on the VPN, and the company that hosts their VPN servers. It can also cause servers to go down, or server hosts to cut the VPN company off completely. Many VPNs would prefer to have fewer customers but avoid that level of hassle.

On top of all that, with a VPN, you don’t have to worry about being hacked. You can watch your favorite shows from anywhere in the world and smoothly bypass government censorship. In short, you’ll need a VPN to protect your online activities and for unrestricted internet access. A VPN is the only way to gain access to the full scope of the world wide web.
Use a different VPN protocol: BestVPN.com recommends the OpenVPN protocol because it is the most secure of them all. Remember, the name of the game is protecting your privacy. Some people opt for other protocols such as PPTP, IKEv2 or L2TP/IPSec in the hopes of squeezing the last drops of speed out of their connection. Keep reading for more information on VPN protocols.
The more locations a VPN provider houses servers, the more flexible it is when you want to choose a server in a less-congested part of the world or geoshift your location. And the more servers it has at each location, the less likely they are to be slow when lots of people are using the service at the same time. Of course, limited bandwidth in and out of an area may still cause connections to lag at peak times even on the most robust networks.
The first of Hide.me's paid tiers is Hide.me Plus, which costs a reasonable $4.99 per month. That's significantly lower than our Editors' Choice winner Private Internet Access, which charges $6.95 per month for its service. This gives you access to all of Hide.me's server locations and all of the company's supported VPN protocols. The data cap gets raised to a very generous 75GB per month, but you're still limited to just one device. For just under two dollars more per month, Private Internet Access gives you a lot more.
PIA is another great option and offers a 7 day money back guarantee. It keeps no logs, which is a claim that it has proved in court! And although optional, its security can be first rate. Its desktop software supports multiple security options, a VPN kill switch, DNS leak protection, and port forwarding. Up to 5 simultaneous connections are permitted. Its Android client is almost as good, and PIA boasts excellent connection speeds. PIA has servers located in 29 other countries.
Using a VPN, all data traffic is confined to a private, encrypted tunnel until they reach the public Internet. Destinations cannot be accessed until after the end of the VPN tunnel is reached. VPN services are quite useful in workplaces, especially for those who use mobile devices in accessing data from a work server. However, the most common use of VPN software is to remain anonymous to ISPs, websites or governments. This is true for users who download files illegally, such as in the case of copyrighted torrent files.
We’ve shown you how to roll your own VPN using Hamachi, and even how to set up Privoxy to secure your web browsing once you have your personal VPN set up. Hamachi isn’t the only option: you can also download and configure OpenVPN (a free SSL VPN) on your own home server,, or if you have a router that supports it, enable OpenVPN on your home router so you can connect back to it when you’re abroad. Combined with Privoxy, you get the privacy and anonymity benefits of a VPN without spending a dime.

Mass surveillance and decryption: What’s less clear is how much traffic government agencies capture—encrypted or otherwise—with a broad, untargeted net. Kalia said, “If you take the ‘Upstream’ NSA program for instance, the government can just store all your VPN encrypted data and try to decrypt it later using various tools in its possession. Though the advantage of using a VPN in this scenario is that the government has to work for it and actively try to decrypt your data … AES-256, as far as [we] know, has not been broken by the NSA, let alone other governments. The problem is also that while AES-256 is unbroken, how it’s implemented in a particular software solution is what can create an attack.”
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